Grant Supports Development of Drug to Prevent Hearing Loss A $2.06 million NIH Phase 2 grant will support final development of a drug that prevents hearing loss caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics. Seattle-based biotech company Oricula Therapeutics, LLC, received the grant to complete the preclinical workup for its lead clinical compound (ORC-13661) and to submit an application to the Food ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   April 01, 2016
Grant Supports Development of Drug to Prevent Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   April 01, 2016
Grant Supports Development of Drug to Prevent Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.21042016.12
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.21042016.12
A $2.06 million NIH Phase 2 grant will support final development of a drug that prevents hearing loss caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics.
Seattle-based biotech company Oricula Therapeutics, LLC, received the grant to complete the preclinical workup for its lead clinical compound (ORC-13661) and to submit an application to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)for subsequent clinical trials. The product would be the first FDA-approved drug for antibiotics-related hearing loss.
Oricula Therapeutics’ research has shown that ORC-13661 provides 100 percent hearing protection for rats co-administered a 10-day course of amikacin, an aminoglycoside. The rats showed no evidence of cochlea hair cell death. The compound is not mutagenic, does not interfere with the effectiveness of the antibiotics, and is well-tolerated.
Aminoglycosides are effective against a variety of serious infectious diseases, including septicemia and tuberculosis, but as many as 20 percent of patients taking them develop measurable, irreversible hearing loss or even deafness.
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April 2016
Volume 21, Issue 4