Human Connection I read with a sense of appreciation Carol Kauffman’s “The Second Set of ‘C’s” (February 2016, “First Person/Last Page”). While our focus on the science of what we do is so essential, she so wisely reminds us to always keep sight of the art of what we do. The technology ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   April 01, 2016
Human Connection
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Development / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Inbox
Inbox   |   April 01, 2016
Human Connection
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.21042016.4
The ASHA Leader, April 2016, Vol. 21, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.21042016.4
I read with a sense of appreciation Carol Kauffman’s “The Second Set of ‘C’s” (February 2016, “First Person/Last Page”). While our focus on the science of what we do is so essential, she so wisely reminds us to always keep sight of the art of what we do. The technology is ever changing, but it is, indeed, the authentic human connection rooted deeply in our profession that keeps us centered, striving to continue learning and truly touched by the effect we can have—whether it’s a preemie learning to safely feed so he can be discharged to home, an infant now with a tracheostomy valve crying aloud for the first time, or devising a communication system for a teenager after a brain-tumor resection. It’s what keeps us going.
Catherine S. Shaker, Orlando, Florida

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April 2016
Volume 21, Issue 4