March 2016 Thomas F. Campbell took office as the 2016 president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation on Jan. 1. Campbell is professor and executive director of the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at the University of Texas at Dallas, where he established the Callier Postdoctoral Fellowship in Communication Disorders; helped to ... People
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People  |   March 01, 2016
March 2016
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Professional Issues & Training / People
People   |   March 01, 2016
March 2016
The ASHA Leader, March 2016, Vol. 21, 16-18. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.21032016.16
The ASHA Leader, March 2016, Vol. 21, 16-18. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.21032016.16
Appointed
Thomas F. Campbell took office as the 2016 president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation on Jan. 1. Campbell is professor and executive director of the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at the University of Texas at Dallas, where he established the Callier Postdoctoral Fellowship in Communication Disorders; helped to institute the Callier Prize for fostering scientific advances in the diagnosis and treatment of communication disorders; and founded the Communication Technology Center, which encourages interdisciplinary collaboration and research and helps develop technology projects related to communication disorders.
In the news
Kathleen C.M. Campbell, an audiologist and professor at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, was featured in a Nov. 23 article on PharmacyTimes.com about medications that can cause hearing loss. Campbell explained how pharmacists can counsel patients on reducing the risk of drug-related hearing loss … Lisa Cannon, Denver Public Schools audiologist and Colorado Department of Education audiology coordinator, wrote a Dec. 4 article for the American Academy of Pediatrics’ HealthyChildren.org about how parents can protect their children’s hearing during the holidaysSandra Levey, professor in the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at Lehman College of the City University of New York, was featured on a Dec. 21 “Today” show segment about loud toys that could damage children’s hearingAmee Shah, associate professor in the School of Health Sciences at Stockton University, was featured in a Dec. 9 article on Reddit’s Upvoted.com about why young people’s voices sound different from older people’s voices. Shah explains presbyphonia.
Retired
Lynne F. Harmon-Burgess, an SLP in Knoxville, Tennessee, has retired after 31 years in private practice. After earning her master’s degree from the University of Tennessee, Harmon-Burgess coordinated speech-language services for Knoxville and Chattanooga area schools. In 1984, she established the Parent-Child Center of Knoxville, Inc., a multidisciplinary pediatric therapy center. She served two terms as president of the Tennessee Association of Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists and received its Honors and the Lifetime Achievement Award. She authored a grant to establish the East Tennessee Council for Early Intervention and played a major role in the passage of Tennessee’s Autism Equity Act. She received appointments from Tennessee’s governors to the Interagency Coordinating Council, which she chaired for two years, and also to the Board of Communication Disorders and Sciences, which she chaired for four years. Harmon-Burgess also served as an ASHA legislative councilor and on several ASHA committees and boards. She received nine ASHA awards for continuing education and is a two-time nominee for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation’s Louis M. DiCarlo Award for Recent Clinical Achievement, which she received in 2008. Harmon-Burgess retires as the founder, owner and president of Parent-Child Services Group, Inc., which has provided approximately 500,000 hours of services to children from more than 6,000 families.
Deaths
Eugene B. Cooper, 81, on Nov. 21, 2015, in Weston, Florida. Cooper received his bachelor’s degree from the State University of New York, Geneseo, in 1955 and his master’s (1957) and doctorate (1962) from Pennsylvania State University. Early in his career, he provided services in Pennsylvania public schools, taught at Ohio University, served as an assistant professor at Penn State, and worked for the Office of Education in the then-Department of Health, Education and Welfare in Washington, D.C. For 30 years, until June 1996, he served as chair of the University of Alabama’s programs in audiology and speech-language pathology and as director of the University of Alabama Speech and Hearing Center. In 1997, Cooper was named “distinguished professor” in the programs of speech-language pathology and communication disorders at Nova Southeastern University. An ASHA Fellow and Honors recipient, Cooper was recognized internationally as a groundbreaking and visionary researcher, scholar and innovator in fluency treatment. In 1976, he published the first commercially available fluency assessment and treatment program for children and adults who stutter, and was inducted into the National Stuttering Association’s Hall of Fame for his lifetime of service to those who stutter. He served as charter president of three national organizations—The Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders, The National Council of State Boards of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and The National Alliance on Stuttering—and as charter chairman of the National Council on Communication Disorders. He served for six years as consultant at large to the Executive Council of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association and served on ASHA’s Committee on Honors. Cooper was elected to five terms on ASHA’s Legislative Council.
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March 2016
Volume 21, Issue 3