Study Finds Vocabulary Delays, Other Factors Predict Which Kids Receive Speech Services Vocabulary delays at 2 years old strongly predict whether children will receive speech-language services by 5 years old, according to new research—but it isn’t the only factor. Race, socioeconomic status and whether a 2-year-old’s parents’ speak English also affect the likelihood of the child eventually receiving those services, find scientists ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   February 01, 2016
Study Finds Vocabulary Delays, Other Factors Predict Which Kids Receive Speech Services
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Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   February 01, 2016
Study Finds Vocabulary Delays, Other Factors Predict Which Kids Receive Speech Services
The ASHA Leader, February 2016, Vol. 21, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.21022016.np
The ASHA Leader, February 2016, Vol. 21, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.21022016.np
Race, socioeconomic status and whether a 2-year-old’s parents’ speak English also affect the likelihood of the child eventually receiving those services, find scientists from Pennsylvania State University, Temple University and the University of California, Irvine in a study published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
Analyzing data from 9,600 children and families who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, lead author Paul Morgan and his team found that, in all children, early expressive vocabulary delays were strongly associated with a child’s later receipt of speech-language services at 24, 48 and 60 months of age.
Black children, compared to otherwise similar white children, were less likely to receive speech-language services. Low socioeconomic background, low birth weight and parents who don’t primarily speak English also may decrease a child’s likely receipt of services at those ages.

Black children, compared to otherwise similar white children, were less likely to receive speech-language services.

Previous studies have shown that early access to services helps children maintain communication gains in future years, as well as lowers their risk for learning or behavioral disabilities and poor school performance. The study authors note that cultural and linguistic sensitivity are important in making sure more children receive appropriate services.
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February 2016
Volume 21, Issue 2