California Project Boosts Follow-Up After Failed Newborn Screenings Researchers at the University of California (UC), Davis, have shown that using telepractice can dramatically improve the rate of follow-up testing for infants who fail their newborn hearing screening. Nationally, more than 97 percent of newborns receive hearing screenings. Of those who fail to pass, approximately 32 percent receive no ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   February 01, 2016
California Project Boosts Follow-Up After Failed Newborn Screenings
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Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   February 01, 2016
California Project Boosts Follow-Up After Failed Newborn Screenings
The ASHA Leader, February 2016, Vol. 21, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.21022016.14
The ASHA Leader, February 2016, Vol. 21, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB4.21022016.14
Researchers at the University of California (UC), Davis, have shown that using telepractice can dramatically improve the rate of follow-up testing for infants who fail their newborn hearing screening.
Nationally, more than 97 percent of newborns receive hearing screenings. Of those who fail to pass, approximately 32 percent receive no further diagnostic assessment and are “lost to follow-up/lost to documention.”
The California Tele-Audiology Program was created in 2011 to improve access to follow-up testing for infants in the rural northern area of Central California. The program links audiologists at UC Davis Children’s Hospital with Mercy Medical Center Redding, where a telepresenter prepares the infant and assists the parents and the remote audiologist.
Families in the region with access to the program had 100-percent participation in follow-up evaluations. Before the project started, the regional rate was about 22 percent.
In the two-year study period, 22 infants were referred to the program for follow-up, and all were tested. Nine of the infants had normal hearing. Of the 13 with some level of hearing loss, eight had severe impairment.
Audiologists and parents participating in the study were comfortable with the technology and highly rated the quality of the links and the overall consultations.
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February 2016
Volume 21, Issue 2