Functional MRI May Predict Children’s Language Skills Post-Cochlear Implant Data from functional MRI of the brain could predict how well a child develops language skills two years after cochlear implant surgery, a new study finds. Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center found that elevated activity in two regions of the brain, evaluated from functional MRIs before implantation, may ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   January 01, 2016
Functional MRI May Predict Children’s Language Skills Post-Cochlear Implant
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Research in Brief   |   January 01, 2016
Functional MRI May Predict Children’s Language Skills Post-Cochlear Implant
The ASHA Leader, January 2016, Vol. 21, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.21012016.15
The ASHA Leader, January 2016, Vol. 21, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.21012016.15
Data from functional MRI of the brain could predict how well a child develops language skills two years after cochlear implant surgery, a new study finds.
Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center found that elevated activity in two regions of the brain, evaluated from functional MRIs before implantation, may be biomarkers in children who do best with implants. The study appears in Brain and Behavior.

Elevated activity in two specific regions of the brain, evaluated from functional brain MRIs before surgery, may be possible biomarkers in children who do best with implants.

The first region, in the left superior and middle temporal gyri, supports speech-recognition and language-association. The second—more surprising, the authors note—region includes the cerebellar structures of the right side.
Forty-four children, 8 months to 5 years old, were evaluated in the study: 21 were control subjects with normal hearing, participating in hearing, speech and cognition tests, and 23 had hearing impairments and were evaluated through auditory tests and MRIs. Two years after surgery, the researchers measured the latter group’s language skills.
Led by Long (Jason) Lu of Cincinnati’s Division of Biomedical Informatics, researchers conducted the study in Lu’s laboratory, which designs algorithms that work with brain MRIs.
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January 2016
Volume 21, Issue 1