Education Department Issues Dyslexia Guidance Schools may use the terms dyslexia, dyscalculia and dysgraphia in Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)-related evaluations, eligibility for service determinations, and IEP documents, according to recently released guidance from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. The “Dear Colleague” letter clarifies that “there is ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   January 01, 2016
Education Department Issues Dyslexia Guidance
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Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   January 01, 2016
Education Department Issues Dyslexia Guidance
The ASHA Leader, January 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.21012016.12
The ASHA Leader, January 2016, Vol. 21, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.21012016.12
Schools may use the terms dyslexia, dyscalculia and dysgraphia in Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)-related evaluations, eligibility for service determinations, and IEP documents, according to recently released guidance from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.
The “Dear Colleague” letter clarifies that “there is nothing in the IDEA that would prohibit” using those terms in IDEA evaluations, eligibility determinations or IEP documents.
The letter responds to concerns from parents, advocacy groups and national disability organizations that schools believe the conditions are not included in IDEA and are reluctant to use them. The letter explains that the list of conditions that qualify as a “specific learning disability” under IDEA expressly includes dyslexia—although not dyscalculia or dysgraphia—but that the list is not exhaustive.
The letter encourages states to review policies, procedures and practices to ensure they do not prohibit the use of the terms in IDEA-related evaluations, eligibility and IEP documents, and to make sure schools and local districts address the unique educational needs of children with specific learning disabilities resulting from dyslexia, dyscalculia and dysgraphia during IEP and other IDEA-related meetings with parents.
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January 2016
Volume 21, Issue 1