Hawaii Speech-Language-Hearing Association Website: hsha.org Facebook: Hawaii Speech-Language-Hearing Association Established: July 31, 1978 Members: 165 Contact: Julie Yatogo, jyatogo@hsha808@gmail.com; 808-651-4604 We provide our members with continuing education opportunities, networking opportunities, legislative affairs updates and professional support. One of our challenges is definitely financial. The cost of living in Hawaii is high ... State Spotlight
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State Spotlight  |   December 01, 2015
Hawaii Speech-Language-Hearing Association
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Hearing & Speech Perception / State Spotlight
State Spotlight   |   December 01, 2015
Hawaii Speech-Language-Hearing Association
The ASHA Leader, December 2015, Vol. 20, 64. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.20122015.64
The ASHA Leader, December 2015, Vol. 20, 64. doi:10.1044/leader.STSP.20122015.64
Website: hsha.org
Facebook: Hawaii Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Established: July 31, 1978
Members: 165
Contact: Julie Yatogo, jyatogo@hsha808@gmail.com; 808-651-4604
How are you making a difference in your members’ professional lives?
We provide our members with continuing education opportunities, networking opportunities, legislative affairs updates and professional support.
What is the most significant challenge, unique circumstance or pressing frustration facing communication sciences and disorders professionals in your state today?
One of our challenges is definitely financial. The cost of living in Hawaii is high compared to many other states and our pay scales tend to be low. Our unique circumstance is our geography: HSHA has members on four islands in Hawaii. This dispersion makes attending continuing education events, even on Oahu—the most populous—a financial challenge for members on Maui, Hawaii (Big Island) and Kauai. Last year, HSHA was successful in offering CEU activities on Maui as well as Oahu.
What is your association’s proudest accomplishment?
We have been in existence for 38 years and one of our proudest accomplishments is the role that HSHA played in obtaining and maintaining our licensure law. In 1976, Hawaii passed state licensure requirements for speech-language pathologists working in private practice, hospitals and academic settings. Licensure was extended to SLPs in the schools and SLPs in other state agencies, such as the Department of Health, in 1982. In the past, the issue of whether or not to dissolve our State Speech Pathology and Audiology Board has come up several times. Each time, HSHA has worked tirelessly to educate our legislators on why it is important to maintain our licensure for the safety of our patients/clients.
What is a particularly memorable event in your association’s history and how did it come about?
Hawaii was one of the first states to mandate newborn hearing screening (Rhode Island was the other). In a 1997 article in the Hawaii Medical Journal, Jean L. Johnson and colleagues stated that Hawaii set the example of having an integrated system of services that included screening, diagnosis and effective intervention.
In a second memorable event, Hawaii was the first state to become an ASHA CEU provider! HSHA may hold the record of the longest CEU administrator, Dorothy Craven, who served 27 years in that position.

Hawaii was one of the first states to mandate newborn hearing screening … Hawaii set the example of having an integrated system of services that included screening, diagnosis and effective intervention.

Do you have a particularly successful advocacy or recruitment strategy to share?
Our most successful advocacy or recruitment strategy has to be the beauty of our islands and our aloha spirit (friendly acceptance). They each speak for themselves. To recruit HSHA members, we offer a $5 coupon to new members and those who renew their membership by Jan. 1 each year. This coupon can be applied to CEU fees. We’ve had great results!
What should every CSD professional in your state know about the association?
HSHA is here for you. Joining HSHA is a good way to network with other professionals, earn CEU credits while being able to “talk story” with others, and advocate for our profession.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2015
Volume 20, Issue 12