LSAT to Change Accommodations Process The process for requesting and granting accommodations on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)—the standardized test required of all law school applicants—will change beginning with requests related to the December 2015 test. The changes are rooted in a 2012 court case brought by the United States and the California Department ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   December 01, 2015
LSAT to Change Accommodations Process
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School-Based Settings / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   December 01, 2015
LSAT to Change Accommodations Process
The ASHA Leader, December 2015, Vol. 20, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.20122015.14
The ASHA Leader, December 2015, Vol. 20, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.20122015.14
The process for requesting and granting accommodations on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)—the standardized test required of all law school applicants—will change beginning with requests related to the December 2015 test.
The changes are rooted in a 2012 court case brought by the United States and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing against the Law School Admission Council, alleging the test administrator’s procedures violated state and federal law protecting people with disabilities).
In a 2014 settlement, LSAC agreed to pay $8.7 million in damages and penalties to settle the alleged violations and to abide by changes to the procedures recommended by a panel of experts.
The council appealed several of those recommendations, and in an August decision the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California upheld most of the recommendations.
The suit alleged LSAC routinely denied testing accommodation requests, even for applicants with a permanent physical disability or who submitted extensive supporting documentation. The settlement requires LSAC to make reasonable accommodations for test-takers with disabilities and limit supporting documentation requests. Among other things, LSAC has agreed to streamline its evaluation of testing accommodation requests by automatically granting most testing accommodations that candidates have previously received for another standardized exam related to post-secondary admissions.
The settlement also prohibits LSAC from “flagging” scores for test takers who receive extended time as an accommodation, establishes criteria for evaluating requests, requires an automatic review by outside professionals before a request may be denied, and creates an appeals process for denied requests.
The U.S. Department of Justice recently issued technical assistance that will help all high-stakes test administrators comply with laws regarding accommodations for individuals with disabilities. It defines who is entitled to testing accommodations, what types of testing accommodations must be provided, and what documentation may be required of the accommodations requestor. The technical assistance document also prohibits flagging the tests of those receiving disability-related accommodations.
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December 2015
Volume 20, Issue 12