November 2015 Lydia Wildman Manni, senior speech-language pathologist at Kennedy Krieger High School in Baltimore, was honored as the National Association of Private Special Education Centers’ Related Services Provider of the Year in May. The award recognizes “excellence and innovation” in working with people with special needs. Kathleen C. M. ... People
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People  |   November 01, 2015
November 2015
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School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / People
People   |   November 01, 2015
November 2015
The ASHA Leader, November 2015, Vol. 20, 14-16. doi:010.1044/leader.PPL.20112015.14
The ASHA Leader, November 2015, Vol. 20, 14-16. doi:010.1044/leader.PPL.20112015.14
Awarded
Lydia Wildman Manni, senior speech-language pathologist at Kennedy Krieger High School in Baltimore, was honored as the National Association of Private Special Education Centers’ Related Services Provider of the Year in May. The award recognizes “excellence and innovation” in working with people with special needs.
In the news
Kathleen C. M. Campbell, an audiologist and professor at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, was featured in an Aug. 21 Wall Street Journal article detailing a trial she is running at a South Carolina Army base to test a drug that may prevent noise-induced hearing loss … Sarah Dachtyl, an SLP working in the Sahuarita (Arizona) Unified School District, was featured in a May 12 article in the Sahuarita Sun about the academic concussion management protocol she developed for the school district … Susan Miller, founder of Voicetrainer, LLC, was featured Aug. 14 on NPR’s Science Friday, commenting on the effect of political candidates’ voices on voters … SLPs Sarah Penzell and Nathan Waller, clinical instructors at Northwestern University, were featured in a series of July news pieces from the Chicago Tribune, MTV News and Chicago public radio station WBEZ about their work with a newly established youth transgender voice and communication program, Be Heard for Who You Are, run jointly by Northwestern’s Center for Audiology, Speech, Language and Learning and the Lurie Children’s Hospital’s Gender and Sex Development Program … Margaret Winter, associate professor of clinical otolaryngology at the University of Southern California’s Caruso Family Center for Childhood Communication, was featured in a CNN segment about a 5-year-old boy who received an auditory brainstem implant. Winter has worked with the boy and his family to develop his hearing and speech post-implant.
Named
Jennifer Ostergren was named interim associate dean of Student Success, Personnel, and Undergraduate Studies for the College of Health and Human Services at California State University–Long Beach. Before her appointment, Ostergren was an associate professor in the university’s speech-language pathology program.
Deaths
Mary Ann O’Brien, 79, on Sept. 8, 2015, in Webster, New York. O’Brien earned her bachelor’s degree from Nazareth College of Rochester in 1957, later earning her master’s from the State University of New York at Geneseo in 1973. She began her career as a speech-language pathologist in the Rochester City School District before moving to the state’s Board of Cooperative Educational Services 1, where she worked her way up from “speech teacher” to director of support services by the time she retired in 1997. During her career, O’Brien was heavily involved with the New York State Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NYSSLHA), sitting on many of its committees and task forces before serving as president. O’Brien, known for her children’s advocacy, also represented NYSSLHA at New York state legislative hearings, working to upgrade requirements for teacher certification for school-based speech-language pathologists to be commensurate with requirements for state licensure and ASHA certification. O’Brien, an ASHA Fellow, also volunteered with the national association on boards and committees, as well as serving as floor manager of the Legislative Council at ASHA conventions. In retirement, she continued to be active in teaching, speaking, publishing and consulting.
Ronald S. Tikofsky died early this summer in California. He received his bachelor’s (1952) and master’s (1953) degrees from the City University of New York’s Brooklyn College and his PhD in speech-language pathology (1957) from the University of Utah. He was a professor and clinician at many universities around the country, including the University of Michigan, where he organized one of the first aphasia rehabilitation programs in a university clinic. Tikofsky later moved to Teachers College at Columbia University where he worked as a longtime adjunct professor of speech-language pathology. He also taught as an associate professor of clinical radiology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia, and served as president of both the American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine’s Brain Imaging Council. Tikofsky’s expertise was in aphasia and acquired language disorders, and he received the Gold Medal of the ACNM for his brain imaging studies of speech and language. Tikofsky continued to work in research at the Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center after his official retirement.
Helen Louise Breon Volz, 78, on Sept. 1, 2015, of leukemia in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania. Volz earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary education with a speech emphasis in 1958, her master’s degree in speech pathology and audiology in 1965, and her PhD in human development and family studies in 1975—all from Pennsylvania State University. During her career, she worked in various settings in central Pennsylvania, including schools, nursing homes, hospitals and at Penn State.
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November 2015
Volume 20, Issue 11