Building-Code Committee Adopts Classroom Acoustics Standard Newly adopted classroom acoustics standards require new permanent and portable classrooms to limit background noise and reverberation time. A committee of the International Code Council formally adopted an amendment establishing a classroom acoustics standard in August, bringing a successful end to an ASHA-led effort that lasted several years. The amendment ... News in Brief
Free
News in Brief  |   November 01, 2015
Building-Code Committee Adopts Classroom Acoustics Standard
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / School-Based Settings / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2015
Building-Code Committee Adopts Classroom Acoustics Standard
The ASHA Leader, November 2015, Vol. 20, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.20112015.6
The ASHA Leader, November 2015, Vol. 20, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.20112015.6
Newly adopted classroom acoustics standards require new permanent and portable classrooms to limit background noise and reverberation time.
A committee of the International Code Council formally adopted an amendment establishing a classroom acoustics standard in August, bringing a successful end to an ASHA-led effort that lasted several years.
The amendment incorporates the classroom acoustics standards of the American National Standards Institute/Acoustical Society of America (ANSI/ASA) into the International Building Code.
The International Building Code’s A117.1 building standard outlines accessibility design features for buildings and facilities, including schools. Typical A117.1 codes include wheelchair ramps, signage, building and room accessibility, and countertop heights, but—until now—did not address noise and reverberation.
ASHA worked with the developers of the ANSI classroom acoustics standard to convert that standard into building code format and with Armstrong Industries, a leading building material manufacturer, to address concerns of building code officials. The United States Access Board, jointly tasked with the U.S. Department of Justice to regulate the Americans With Disabilities Act, also helped craft and advocate for the code proposal.
The new classroom-acoustics building code identifies the reverberation rates for various sizes of occupied and unoccupied classrooms. Once state and local building code agencies adopt the A117.1 code—a likely situation—all new school construction projects in those jurisdictions must comply with this standard.
The A117.1 Committee is still reviewing proposed changes to other sections of the building code, but has informed ASHA that the classroom acoustics standard will be part of the next edition of the standard, expected in 2016.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2015
Volume 20, Issue 11