Stuttering, Rhythm Perception Deficiency May Be Related Stuttering and difficulty identifying a music-like beat could be linked, new research suggests. In a study measuring perception specifically, researchers at Michigan State University may have found that not being able to perceive and maintain a beat could hinder speech fluency. “Stuttering has primarily been interpreted as a speech motor ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   October 01, 2015
Stuttering, Rhythm Perception Deficiency May Be Related
Author Notes
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   October 01, 2015
Stuttering, Rhythm Perception Deficiency May Be Related
The ASHA Leader, October 2015, Vol. 20, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB6.20102015.np
The ASHA Leader, October 2015, Vol. 20, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB6.20102015.np
Stuttering and difficulty identifying a music-like beat could be linked, new research suggests.
In a study measuring perception specifically, researchers at Michigan State University may have found that not being able to perceive and maintain a beat could hinder speech fluency.
“Stuttering has primarily been interpreted as a speech motor difficulty, but this is the first study that shows it’s related to a rhythm-perception deficit—in other words, the ability to perceive and keep a beat,” says Devin McAuley, co-author of the study, which was published in the journal Brain and Language. “That’s important because it identifies potential interventions [that] might focus on improving beat perception in children who stutter, which then might translate to improved fluency in speech.”
Where past studies had participants tap out a beat, making it impossible to distinguish whether rhythm perception or motor production was the issue, the new study tested 34 children’s abilities to identify rhythmic drumbeats in a computer game. The non-stuttering control group did much better at telling which rhythms were the same or not.
The findings of the study, whose first-listed author is Michigan State’s Elizabeth Wieland, fit with previous research that shows speaking in time with a metronome can improve speech fluency in adults who stutter.
2 Comments
October 23, 2015
Jessica Bandstra
Diagnostic tool?
I wonder if this could be used as a tool to differentiate between children who have developmental disfluency that they will grow out of, and children who have a true fluency problem that requires intervention.
March 9, 2016
Maria Hargrove
Adult population
Has this study been replicated with adult stuttering patients? Thanks!
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2015
Volume 20, Issue 10