Oozing With Oobleck With the help of a wonderful occupational therapist co-worker, I created a multisensory experience with a group of preschoolers during our “picnic” theme this summer. Squishing and squeezing chunks of watermelon, we mixed the juice with cornstarch right inside the fruit to create a delicious, summer-scented “oobleck” (a non-Newtonian ... Glimpses
Free
Glimpses  |   September 01, 2015
Oozing With Oobleck
Author Notes
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   September 01, 2015
Oozing With Oobleck
The ASHA Leader, September 2015, Vol. 20, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.20092015.10
The ASHA Leader, September 2015, Vol. 20, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.20092015.10
With the help of a wonderful occupational therapist co-worker, I created a multisensory experience with a group of preschoolers during our “picnic” theme this summer. Squishing and squeezing chunks of watermelon, we mixed the juice with cornstarch right inside the fruit to create a delicious, summer-scented “oobleck” (a non-Newtonian fluid that acts as both a liquid and a solid). Even though I had spoons available, I was impressed that all the kids used their hands to help mix. We were able to touch, smell, see and hear—and the result was a lot of novel language! In addition to learning many new verbs and adjectives, the preschoolers worked on turn-taking with peers, making requests, and sequencing the events of a recipe. Starting our group sessions with sensory activities helps set our theme for the day, aids in the transition away from parents/caregivers, and eases the pressure of “talking” in a fun way. We continued the watermelon-themed day with a taste of real watermelon (from the unused other half) during snack time.
About me:
I am a speech-language pathologist at Clinical Associates of the Finger Lakes in Victor, New York, providing individual and group treatment to the birth-to-5 population. I received my bachelor’s degree from the State University of New York College at Cortland and my master’s degree in speech-language pathology from Nazareth College. My nickname, “Miss Cake,” comes from clients who demonstrated velar assimilation when trying to produce “Cait.” I love that through social media, we can share ideas, activities and favorite materials with professionals from all over!
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
September 2015
Volume 20, Issue 9