SIG 5 Alters Focus to Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders ASHA Special Interest Group 5, formerly Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, has a new name and mission: Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders. The new name and focus come in response to the creation in March of SIG 19, Speech Science, a changed supported by SIG 5. With the creation of a ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   September 01, 2015
SIG 5 Alters Focus to Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders
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ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   September 01, 2015
SIG 5 Alters Focus to Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders
The ASHA Leader, September 2015, Vol. 20, 58. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.20092015.58
The ASHA Leader, September 2015, Vol. 20, 58. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.20092015.58
ASHA Special Interest Group 5, formerly Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, has a new name and mission: Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders.
The new name and focus come in response to the creation in March of SIG 19, Speech Science, a changed supported by SIG 5. With the creation of a new group devoted to speech science, SIG 5 will focus on the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary study of disorders of the craniofacial complex (syndromic and nonsyndromic) and of cleft and noncleft velopharyngeal disorders and their manifestations in children and adults.
This new title encompasses the multiple components of speech, language, oral nonspeech and feeding disorders in individuals.
The SIG will:
  • Provide leadership, advocacy and resources for issues related to craniofacial and velopharyngeal disorders to ensure that services are provided by qualified individuals, and to inform clinicians and other professionals regarding new research and developments from clinical, educational and scientific perspectives.

  • Facilitate knowledge and professional practice skills in care provision to people of all ages with craniofacial and velopharyngeal disorders along the entire spectrum of structural and functional disorders of the craniofacial complex and velopharynx as well as the articulation and resonance consequences of acquired disorders due to facial trauma, oral/pharyngeal cancers and neurologic origin. Information will focus on comprehensive management including etiology, evaluation, and diagnosis and treatment of these often-complex disorders.

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September 2015
Volume 20, Issue 9