Agree With Me, Talk Like Me If you share similar views with a person, you’re more likely to closely mirror his or her speech patterns, according to research from the University of Rochester and Ohio State University. It’s not news that humans mimic others’ behaviors, including speech, laughter and posture, but what the new study, published ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2015
Agree With Me, Talk Like Me
Author Notes
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2015
Agree With Me, Talk Like Me
The ASHA Leader, August 2015, Vol. 20, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.20082015.17
The ASHA Leader, August 2015, Vol. 20, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.20082015.17
If you share similar views with a person, you’re more likely to closely mirror his or her speech patterns, according to research from the University of Rochester and Ohio State University.
It’s not news that humans mimic others’ behaviors, including speech, laughter and posture, but what the new study, published in the journal Language Variation and Change, may have found is that “the degree to which speakers align is socially mediated,” says Florian Jaeger, co-author of the study and associate professor of brain and cognitive sciences at Rochester.
Researchers had 340 participants listen to ideologically charged messages delivered in a specific sentence structure (for example, “Congress is giving too much money to welfare moochers” or “Congress is giving welfare moochers too much money”). Afterward, they were shown cartoon illustrations of situations, such as a waitress handing a banana to a monk, and were asked to describe what they saw.
Although most participants subconsciously aligned their speech with the earlier speaker’s sentence structure (“The waitress is giving a banana to the monk” or “The waitress is giving the monk a banana”), the authors found that the degree of alignment increased or decreased based on whether they agreed or not with the ideological views presented. Some participants who disagreed didn’t align at all, and others who identified themselves as compromisers displayed more alignment.
“Our social judgments about others and our general attitude toward conflict are affecting even the most automatic and subconscious aspects of how we express ourselves with language,” says lead author Kodi Weatherholtz.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2015
Volume 20, Issue 8