Noisy Living May Widen the Waistline Cars honking, airplanes roaring and trains rumbling by your house could be related to weight gain, according to research from Sweden. The new findings suggest exposure to one or more of these three noise situations may increase the likelihood people add pounds to their midsection. Led by Andrei Pyko of ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2015
Noisy Living May Widen the Waistline
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2015
Noisy Living May Widen the Waistline
The ASHA Leader, August 2015, Vol. 20, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20082015.17
The ASHA Leader, August 2015, Vol. 20, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20082015.17
Cars honking, airplanes roaring and trains rumbling by your house could be related to weight gain, according to research from Sweden.
The new findings suggest exposure to one or more of these three noise situations may increase the likelihood people add pounds to their midsection. Led by Andrei Pyko of the Institute of Environmental Medicine, a part of the Swedish Karolinska Institutet, the study authors examined data collected through questionnaires and medical examinations from 5,075 people living in suburban and rural Stockholm between 2002 and 2006.
There was no link between road-traffic noise and overall BMI, but there was a connection between road-traffic noise and waist size, as well as to the waist-to-hip ratio. The most significant association occurred in people who were exposed to all three noise situations, doubling an already 25 percent risk for central weight gain from single-source exposure.
The observational study, published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine, did not produce any definitive conclusions regarding cause or effect, though the authors suggest the noise could cause psychological stress that could increase production of cortisol, a hormone connected to mid-body fat deposits.
“This may explain why the effects of noise were mainly seen for markers of central obesity, such as waist circumference and waist-hip ratio, rather than for generalized obesity, measured by BMI,” the authors note.
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August 2015
Volume 20, Issue 8