Privileged to Learn From Robert West I write to supplement recent well-deserved tributes to Robert West, who is regarded as the founder and father of speech-language pathology in the United States. I was privileged to be his student at Brooklyn College of CUNY; in a graduate research course he encouraged my interest in cleft palate, which ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   November 01, 2008
Privileged to Learn From Robert West
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  • Maurice Miller, New York, New York mhm1@nyu.edu
    Maurice Miller, New York, New York mhm1@nyu.edu×
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Inbox
Inbox   |   November 01, 2008
Privileged to Learn From Robert West
The ASHA Leader, November 2008, Vol. 13, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.13162008.4
The ASHA Leader, November 2008, Vol. 13, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.13162008.4
I write to supplement recent well-deserved tributes to Robert West, who is regarded as the founder and father of speech-language pathology in the United States. I was privileged to be his student at Brooklyn College of CUNY; in a graduate research course he encouraged my interest in cleft palate, which resulted in two articles published in peer-reviewed journals on hearing loss in people with cleft palate. He encouraged my efforts to write a book, which he edited, that went on to receive a fairly wide acceptance.
To have mastered the first chapter of Rehabilitation of Speech by West, Kennedy, and Carr was to know most of what was known in those days. His first section on diagnosis was so detailed and challenging it was said that only West and a higher power were capable of mastering its contents. His probing, Socratic-reasoning sections were anxiety-producing—and unforgettable—learning experiences.
West also was the quintessential Renaissance man who acted in a number of plays and wrote a master text on phonetics, several books on public speaking, and at least one novel.
Robert West understood more about the relationship of hearing to speech and language than many others and played a key role in making audiology a part of the discipline. My career as an audiologist would not have been possible without his intellectual and professional stimulation. I join with others who were blessed to learn from this remarkable intellectual giant.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2008
Volume 13, Issue 16