Not Music to Our Ears The recent news about the use of popular music as a tool of “enhanced interrogation” (aka torture) of so-called “enemy combatants” is terribly disturbing, not in the least because the music was played at 79 dB, just below the decibel level that would cause permanent damage. Were these instructions always ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   March 01, 2010
Not Music to Our Ears
Author Notes
  • Nora Freeman, Port Chester, N.Y. freemanora@yahoo.com
    Nora Freeman, Port Chester, N.Y. freemanora@yahoo.com×
  • Editor’s note: ASHA has not taken a position on this issue. Thank you for bringing it to readers’ attention.
    Editor’s note: ASHA has not taken a position on this issue. Thank you for bringing it to readers’ attention.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / ASHA News & Member Stories / Inbox
Inbox   |   March 01, 2010
Not Music to Our Ears
The ASHA Leader, March 2010, Vol. 15, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.15032010.2
The ASHA Leader, March 2010, Vol. 15, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.15032010.2
The recent news about the use of popular music as a tool of “enhanced interrogation” (aka torture) of so-called “enemy combatants” is terribly disturbing, not in the least because the music was played at 79 dB, just below the decibel level that would cause permanent damage. Were these instructions always followed? I think we can all draw our own conclusions on that question. But even if permanent hearing damage did not ensue, I still think it is a matter of audiological concern that painful sound levels have been used to manipulate people, especially in concert with all the other things that were being done to these detainees being held without trial. Has ASHA taken a position on this? If not, why not?
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FROM THIS ISSUE
March 2010
Volume 15, Issue 3