More on Animal Research I am writing to express my wholehearted agreement with Holly Openshaw’s letter in the Nov. 3, 2009, issue. I have actively opposed vivisection for years, and I was comforted to see that others in our profession are also concerned about this issue. As Openshaw stated, “…it is morally wrong to ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   January 01, 2010
More on Animal Research
Author Notes
  • Shirley Charney Feldman, Montgomery Village, Md.
    Shirley Charney Feldman, Montgomery Village, Md.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Inbox
Inbox   |   January 01, 2010
More on Animal Research
The ASHA Leader, January 2010, Vol. 15, 38. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.15012010.38
The ASHA Leader, January 2010, Vol. 15, 38. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.15012010.38
I am writing to express my wholehearted agreement with Holly Openshaw’s letter in the Nov. 3, 2009, issue. I have actively opposed vivisection for years, and I was comforted to see that others in our profession are also concerned about this issue. As Openshaw stated, “…it is morally wrong to use animals as test subjects,” even if they are well-treated, which is often not the case. In fact, exposés on national television, as well as other sources, have been providing evidence of problems in the care of research animals for years, including outright abuse in some facilities.
Unfortunately, USDA enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act is highly inconsistent. In addition to the ethical problem, the results obtained in non-human animal subjects are frequently not applicable to humans. In some cases, relying on these data has been seriously detrimental to human health (for example, the occurrence of birth defects in babies of mothers who were given the drug Thalidomide while pregnant). A final concern is that animal research is paid for with the limited funds that could be better spent on projects utilizing newer methodologies with higher validity for human patients.
As a practicing SLP for more than 20 years, the results of non-human animal studies have never been relevant to my treatment of human patients. I look forward to the day when this outdated, inhumane, unreliable practice will be a part of history, like so many others once thought of as acceptable.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
January 2010
Volume 15, Issue 1