Choosing Communication Methodologies I was excited to read Janet Farrell's article, “Developing a Strong Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program,” in the March 24 issue. As a pediatric audiologist serving newly diagnosed infants and children, this issue is very close to my heart. Timely (and correct) diagnosis along with appropriate amplification and quick ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   May 01, 2009
Choosing Communication Methodologies
Author Notes
  • Kimberli Davenport, Portland, Oregon
    Kimberli Davenport, Portland, Oregon×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Inbox
Inbox   |   May 01, 2009
Choosing Communication Methodologies
The ASHA Leader, May 2009, Vol. 14, 46. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.14072009.46
The ASHA Leader, May 2009, Vol. 14, 46. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.14072009.46
I was excited to read Janet Farrell's article, “Developing a Strong Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program,” in the March 24 issue. As a pediatric audiologist serving newly diagnosed infants and children, this issue is very close to my heart. Timely (and correct) diagnosis along with appropriate amplification and quick implementation of early intervention services certainly can make a world of difference for children's speech and language development.
In addition to showcasing children learning sign as a primary communication mode, I think it would be valuable to address that there are (or should be) different communication methods that families have to choose from when beginning early intervention services. In some states, Hands and Voices offers a “Guide by Your Side” in which people are trained to talk with parents during this critical time and provide them with unbiased information about different communication methodologies. Although our program provides an intensive auditory-oral/auditory-verbal approach, we believe that families should be able to make the best decision for their child and family based on as much information (hopefully evidence-based!) as possible.
While some families may choose to start with sign, both professionals and parents should know that when the EHDI guidelines are followed and children are served by highly trained professionals, children the same age as the toddler in the article could be saying those words instead of only signing them. Both Oral Deaf Education and Alexander Graham Bell can provide parents and professionals with information on developing spoken language in children.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
May 2009
Volume 14, Issue 7