Inclusive Terminology for Classroom Services Over the past year, I have noticed an increase in the use of the term “push-in” to describe treatment being conducted in the classroom. Implementing speech and language treatment in the classroom is not a new occurrence for many of us working in preschool and early intervention programs. We have ... Inbox
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Inclusive Terminology for Classroom Services
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Inbox   |   March 01, 2009
Inclusive Terminology for Classroom Services
The ASHA Leader, March 2009, Vol. 14, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.14042009.4
The ASHA Leader, March 2009, Vol. 14, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.14042009.4
Over the past year, I have noticed an increase in the use of the term “push-in” to describe treatment being conducted in the classroom. Implementing speech and language treatment in the classroom is not a new occurrence for many of us working in preschool and early intervention programs. We have been “integrating” our services into the classroom routines and activities for years. It would be great if we, as speech-language pathologists, would stop using the term “push-in,” which conveys a lack of reciprocal communication among team members. Colleagues, let us create an inclusive and collaborative message, and eliminate the term “push-in” from our writings, meetings, and speech!
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FROM THIS ISSUE
March 2009
Volume 14, Issue 4