Early Intervention Focus Quality early intervention (EI) is not a watered-down version of Part B as the authors of “Service Delivery in Natural Environments” (Nov. 25, 2008) would have the reader believe. Instead, the central foci of EI are the concerns and priorities of the family, which are expressed within the IFSP [Individual ... Inbox
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Early Intervention Focus
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  • Ross Adams, San Diego, California
    Ross Adams, San Diego, California×
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Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Inbox
Inbox   |   February 01, 2009
Early Intervention Focus
The ASHA Leader, February 2009, Vol. 14, 46. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.14022009.46
The ASHA Leader, February 2009, Vol. 14, 46. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.14022009.46
Quality early intervention (EI) is not a watered-down version of Part B as the authors of “Service Delivery in Natural Environments” (Nov. 25, 2008) would have the reader believe.
Instead, the central foci of EI are the concerns and priorities of the family, which are expressed within the IFSP [Individual Family Service Plan] document as desired outcomes for the child (and family, as appropriate). Services are selected collaboratively by the IFSP team—which includes the parents—to support the family in achieving those outcomes. “Placement” isn’t part of EI vernacular as the intention of EI is to capitalize on learning opportunities inherent in the routines and activities of family life and provide in those contexts—through reflection, coaching, and relationship-based models—guidance to parents, knowing they are capable of providing appropriate stimulation.
Parents of young children with hearing loss, like all parents, want and generally know what is best for their children when given the opportunity to see what works and what doesn’t. The aim, therefore, of EI is to heighten observational skills and facilitate confidence in responding appropriately to children's needs—not to circumvent the parental role as language facilitator by putting babies on buses and sending them off to school. Creating an artificial environment in which to work toward a comparable end during a fraction of a child's waking hours is, minimally, unnecessary and potentially counterproductive as it may undermine a parent's confidence in facilitating development independently during the 80%–99% of a child's waking hours he/she spends away from professional support.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2009
Volume 14, Issue 2