Children’s Difficult ASD Behaviors May Benefit From Parent Training by Professionals Hands-on training in behavior management for parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may work better than simple education programs, a new study finds. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the research suggests that the children of parents who received training from a therapist—learning strategies for ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2015
Children’s Difficult ASD Behaviors May Benefit From Parent Training by Professionals
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2015
Children’s Difficult ASD Behaviors May Benefit From Parent Training by Professionals
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB5.20072015.16
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB5.20072015.16
Hands-on training in behavior management for parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may work better than simple education programs, a new study finds.
Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the research suggests that the children of parents who received training from a therapist—learning strategies for managing tantrums, aggression, self-injury and uncooperativeness—showed more improvement in behavior compared with peers whose parents received only educational sessions.
Children in both groups improved, but parent training was clearly better on measures of disruptive and noncompliant behavior, says lead author Karen Bearss of the Marcus Autism Center and Emory University School of Medicine.
The multisite study followed 180 children with ASD, ages 3–7, and their parents over 24 weeks. Half the parents received the training program—including 11 core sessions, two optional sessions, two phone check-ins and two home visits, all of which focused on teaching skills to manage disruptive behaviors—while the other half participated in the education program, comprising 12 core sessions and one home visit that simply provided information about autism.
Although children in both study groups showed improvements, the training group displayed the biggest gains. In an overall behavior assessment performed by a specialist blind to the groupings, 69 percent of the children in the parent-training group improved, versus 40 percent of the parent-education group.
Study authors say the next step is to start increasing parent training in real-life ASD intervention.
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July 2015
Volume 20, Issue 7