Genes May Increase Risk for Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Some people may be more genetically susceptible to noise-induced hearing loss than others, according to new findings from a genome-wide association study on mice published in PLOS Genetics. Scientists at Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California may have identified Nox3 as the critical gene for susceptibility to noise-induced ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2015
Genes May Increase Risk for Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2015
Genes May Increase Risk for Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20072015.15
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.20072015.15
Some people may be more genetically susceptible to noise-induced hearing loss than others, according to new findings from a genome-wide association study on mice published in PLOS Genetics.
Scientists at Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California may have identified Nox3 as the critical gene for susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss, one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The gene is almost exclusively expressed in the inner ear.
Although the authors say this topic requires more research before any clinical recommendations can be made, “Understanding the biological processes that affect susceptibility to hearing loss due to loud noise exposure is an important factor in reducing the risk,” says the study’s lead, Rick A. Friedman, professor of otolaryngology and neurosurgery and otologist. “We have made great advances in hearing restoration, but nothing can compare to protecting the hearing you have and preventing hearing loss in the first place.”

“Understanding the biological processes that affect susceptibility to hearing loss due to loud noise exposure is an important factor in reducing the risk.”

Previous studies on gene association in noise-induced hearing loss have been small and unreplicated, the authors of the new USC study note. Their mouse study scoured the entire genome for common genetic variants that may be associated with the trait, the authors say.
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July 2015
Volume 20, Issue 7