Pilot Program Provides Multisensory Screenings for Veterans Salus University in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, has teamed with the Philadelphia VA Medical Center and the Department of Defense’s Hearing Center of Excellence and Vision Center of Excellence to provide free multisensory screenings for student veterans at Montgomery County Community College and the Community College of Philadelphia. In the Salus ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   July 01, 2015
Pilot Program Provides Multisensory Screenings for Veterans
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2015
Pilot Program Provides Multisensory Screenings for Veterans
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.20072015.12
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.20072015.12
Salus University in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, has teamed with the Philadelphia VA Medical Center and the Department of Defense’s Hearing Center of Excellence and Vision Center of Excellence to provide free multisensory screenings for student veterans at Montgomery County Community College and the Community College of Philadelphia.
In the Salus Veterans Readiness Initiative Multisensory Screening and Care pilot program in April, university optometry faculty, audiology faculty and students conducted free vision, hearing and balance screenings for veteran students at the two community colleges. The VA Medical Center provided onsite liaison and outreach, including help with VA health care enrollment and case management.
Many veterans have been exposed to blasts and other trauma, which can cause mild traumatic brain injury and/or post-concussion syndrome, as well as hearing loss, blurry vision, headaches, aversion to light and sounds, and dizziness. Veterans with these sensory dysfunctions typically pass standard vision and hearing tests, and require more in-depth exploration using specialized visual and auditory assessment.
The screening program will serve as a model as the initiative continues.
“Leading the Navy Medical Service Corps gave me a unique understanding of the health care issues faced by returning veterans,” says Michael H. Mittelman, Salus University president and former deputy surgeon general of the U.S. Navy. “This program will help these young men and women get back to their lives. We are proud to partner with these outstanding organizations to offer veterans the health care they need and deserve.”
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July 2015
Volume 20, Issue 7