British Company Makes Toys That Reflect Children’s Disabilities British toy developer MakieLab—the world’s first retailer of 3-D-printed, create-your-own dolls—now offers hearing aids in its range of accessories. Makie developed the new line of accessories (which also includes walking aids) and the ability to alter facial features in response to the Toy Like Me Facebook campaign (#toylikeme). The crusade ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   July 01, 2015
British Company Makes Toys That Reflect Children’s Disabilities
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Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2015
British Company Makes Toys That Reflect Children’s Disabilities
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.20072015.12
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB5.20072015.12
British toy developer MakieLab—the world’s first retailer of 3-D-printed, create-your-own dolls—now offers hearing aids in its range of accessories.
Makie developed the new line of accessories (which also includes walking aids) and the ability to alter facial features in response to the Toy Like Me Facebook campaign (#toylikeme). The crusade calls for toys that reflect children in more inclusive ways than the market currently offers.
Toy Like Me’s Facebook posts of toy “makeovers” by parents of children with disabilities or disfigurements have been widely shared by enthusiastic parents eager for positive representation of disability in toys. The posts include photos of parent-modified dolls and stuffed animals with a variety of accessories, including hearing aids, cochlear implants, glasses, service animals and wheelchairs.
Unlike other mass manufacturing efforts, which usually entail expensive tooling and long development times, 3-D printing allows customers to choose personalized features that Makie can deliver within days of a request.
“It’s fantastic that our supercharged design and manufacturing process means we can respond to a need that’s not met by traditional toy companies,” Matthew Wiggins, MakieLab chief technical officer, says. “We’re hoping to make some kids—and thei parents—really happy with these inclusive accessories.”
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July 2015
Volume 20, Issue 7