Report Identifies Gaps in Telepractice Coverage and Reimbursement Five states—Maine, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Tennessee and Virginia—and the District of Columbia rate highest on a telemedicine “report card,” indicating they have policies that encourage telemedicine adoption. The May report from the American Telemedicine Association updates an initial assessment issued in September 2014. Many states took action on their ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   July 01, 2015
Report Identifies Gaps in Telepractice Coverage and Reimbursement
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Practice Management / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2015
Report Identifies Gaps in Telepractice Coverage and Reimbursement
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.20072015.11
The ASHA Leader, July 2015, Vol. 20, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.20072015.11
Five states—Maine, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Tennessee and Virginia—and the District of Columbia rate highest on a telemedicine “report card,” indicating they have policies that encourage telemedicine adoption.
The May report from the American Telemedicine Association updates an initial assessment issued in September 2014. Many states took action on their regulations following the initial report, prompting the update.
State Telemedicine Gaps Analysis: Coverage and Reimbursement” compares telemedicine adoption for every U.S. state based on 13 indicators related to coverage and reimbursement, including rehabilitation services and eligible providers and technologies. The results are based on information collected from state statutes, regulations, Medicaid program manuals and fee schedules, state employee handbooks, and other federal and state policy resources.
Two states—Maryland and Mississippi—that received an “A” rating in 2014 have dropped to “B” as a result of additional telehealth coverage restrictions in their Medicaid plans. The “B” category includes 28 other states.
Thirteen states received a “C” rating, and two states—Connecticut and Rhode Island—scored the lowest, suggesting “many barriers and little opportunity for telemedicine advancement,” according to the report.
The report includes individual state report cards on parity (among private insurance, Medicaid and state employee health plans), Medicaid service coverage and conditions, and innovative payment or service delivery models.
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July 2015
Volume 20, Issue 7