Netflix Not Subject to ADA, Federal Court Rules The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) does not apply to Netflix, according to a federal appeals court, because the online video provider is “not connected to any actual, physical place.” In March 2011, Donald Cullen sued Netflix because all of its videos are not close-captioned. The suit was dismissed in ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2015
Netflix Not Subject to ADA, Federal Court Rules
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Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2015
Netflix Not Subject to ADA, Federal Court Rules
The ASHA Leader, June 2015, Vol. 20, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB8.20062015.11
The ASHA Leader, June 2015, Vol. 20, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB8.20062015.11
The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) does not apply to Netflix, according to a federal appeals court, because the online video provider is “not connected to any actual, physical place.”
In March 2011, Donald Cullen sued Netflix because all of its videos are not close-captioned. The suit was dismissed in district court in 2013, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit—which covers most of the Western United States—upheld that decision in April.
The “unpublished” decision is not intended as precedent in other cases, and other courts may rule differently. In a similar suit filed by the National Association for the Deaf (NAD) in Massachusetts, the judge found that Netflix was a “place of public accommodation” and would have to face the lawsuit. Netflix settled the case with NAD, agreeing to pay $750,000 in legal fees and caption all of its videos.
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June 2015
Volume 20, Issue 6