Pressure to Generate Revenue I was happy to see “Productivity in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology” in the May 17, 2011, issue. Drs. Dennis and Gonzenbach contributed organized, thorough, and useful information about managing productivity that was, critically, from people who are involved directly in the professions. Efficient service delivery is something that we should ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   September 01, 2011
Pressure to Generate Revenue
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Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   September 01, 2011
Pressure to Generate Revenue
The ASHA Leader, September 2011, Vol. 16, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.16092011.4
The ASHA Leader, September 2011, Vol. 16, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.16092011.4
I was happy to see “Productivity in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology” in the May 17, 2011, issue. Drs. Dennis and Gonzenbach contributed organized, thorough, and useful information about managing productivity that was, critically, from people who are involved directly in the professions. Efficient service delivery is something that we should strive for: Respect for our clients’ time and for our own time demands it. It is also understandable that medical facilities should expect a certain level of productivity to stay financially afloat and continue to support our much-needed services.
That being said, there is a darker side of the productivity coin. My experience in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) has been that productivity is used by administrators to place unreasonable pressure on rehabilitation department managers to generate revenue. This pressure is passed down to the physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists treating patients. The reasons for these productivity requirements are transparent, no matter how well a manager explains their value as a tool for effective treatment. I have experienced this in a variety of SNF settings, and it does not appear to be isolated to one organization.
I urge audiologists and SLPs to understand how productivity works in our professions and with our clients, and to communicate this information clearly and firmly to those who monitor it in your workplace. I am confident that the members of our professions have the guts and ability to push productivity requirements in a more ethical and realistic direction.
Amy DiBattista Canton, Massachusetts
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September 2011
Volume 16, Issue 9