Races to Watch for in November The 2002 midterm elections have the distinction of being among the tightest in recent memory. Of the 34 Senate seats up for re-election, only 15 are considered competitive. Of the 435 House seats up, only 44 are in play. With only a six-seat majority in the House and a one-seat ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   October 01, 2002
Races to Watch for in November
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Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   October 01, 2002
Races to Watch for in November
The ASHA Leader, October 2002, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.07192002.3
The ASHA Leader, October 2002, Vol. 7, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.07192002.3
The 2002 midterm elections have the distinction of being among the tightest in recent memory. Of the 34 Senate seats up for re-election, only 15 are considered competitive. Of the 435 House seats up, only 44 are in play. With only a six-seat majority in the House and a one-seat majority in the Senate, both Republicans and Democrats, respectively, are working overtime to maintain their status in their chamber. Here are a few of the key races that will decide the fate of the House and Senate. The Cook Political Report—a nonpartisan political analysis of state, local, and federal elections—served as a resource for this report.
Maryland 8th Congressional District
Republican Rep. Connie Morella represents the 8th Congressional District in Maryland, traditionally a Democratic district. She was unopposed in her Sept. 10 primary. Democratic nominee and state Sen. Chris Van Hollen won a four-way primary with 44% of the vote. This race is considered too close to call.
New Hampshire Senate
The current senator, Republican Bob Smith, lost the three-way primary to Rep. John E. Sununu by a margin of 45% to 53%. Sununu, son of former White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, represents the 1st District in New Hampshire. Sununu now will face the current governor, Democrat Jeanne Shaheen. Gov. Shaheen was unopposed in the Sept. 10 Democratic primary. This race is considered too close to call.
Connecticut 5th Congressional District
Redistricting reduced Connecticut’s congressional delegation from six seats to five. This pushed Democrat Rep. James H. Maloney and Republican Rep. Nancy L. Johnson into one western district. Maloney and Johnson each bring about half of their current constituents into the new district. Neither incumbent had challengers in the Sept. 10 primary. This race is considered a toss-up.
Missouri Senate
Current Democratic Sen. Jean Carnahan is locked in a tight race with former Republican Rep. Jim Talent as she attempts to win the right to serve the remaining four years of the term of her late husband, Gov. Mel Carnahan. A Zogby poll, released Sept. 22, surveyed 500 likely voters. The poll shows Carnahan ahead of Talent 48% to 40% (margin of error +/- 4.5%). The race is still considered too close to call.
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October 2002
Volume 7, Issue 19