Conference for New York: Harmony and Healing For the second year in a row, the spirit of harmony and healing warmed the wintry landscape at The Conference for New York, sponsored by the Higher Education Opportunities for Speech Providers Committee and the Speech and Hearing Center at St. John’s University. More than 350 school-based speech-language pathologists and ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   March 01, 2003
Conference for New York: Harmony and Healing
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   March 01, 2003
Conference for New York: Harmony and Healing
The ASHA Leader, March 2003, Vol. 8, 2-13. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.08042003.2
The ASHA Leader, March 2003, Vol. 8, 2-13. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.08042003.2
For the second year in a row, the spirit of harmony and healing warmed the wintry landscape at The Conference for New York, sponsored by the Higher Education Opportunities for Speech Providers Committee and the Speech and Hearing Center at St. John’s University. More than 350 school-based speech-language pathologists and other clinicians braved the weather to attend the Jan. 10 event.
The conference was first held last year to demonstrate support for SLPs working in New York City schools who experienced the trauma and loss of the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, 2001. Outstanding speakers volunteered their time to come to New York City and present workshops to show their support. Corporate sponsors also backed the conference, including American Guidance Service, Phonic Ear, Thinking Publications, The Psychological Corporation, and Super Duper. The conference was supported by the New York City Department of Education and 10 graduate programs in the Higher Education Opportunities Consortium.
After the success of last year’s conference, organizers decided to hold a second conference this year with the support of the same sponsors and speakers, and the addition of more volunteer workshop leaders and speakers.
Participants in the 2003 conference were welcomed by Donna Geffner, coordinator of the event, along with Arlene Wisan of St. John’s University and Jane Coyle of the New York City Department of Education. Jerry Cammarata, a former city commissioner and current associate executive director of Coney Island Hospital, provided welcoming remarks.
Mike McKinley of McKinley Industries, a veteran performer with over 30 years’ experience in radio and television broadcasting, presented a keynote address on “If We Fail to Change, We Fail.” McKinley is president of Thinking Publications and former president and award recipient of the National Speakers Association. He made the audience laugh and smile as we reflected on where we are and where we need to be. His dramatic and poignant delivery set a hopeful yet challenging tone as we embarked on the day.
The conference featured workshop presentations by five outstanding authors, researchers, and practitioners in the field:
  • Wayne A. Secord —coordinator of the National Center for Speech-Language Pathology in Schools, a joint project of the University of Cincinnati and Miami University—presented a workshop on “Top 10 Considerations in the Education and Treatment of Articulation and Phonological Disorders.” He identified the 10 most important targets for phonological intervention and discussed writing treatment plans with measurable goals and objectives, interpreting a phonological sample, and developing strategies for intervention.

  • Elisabeth H. Wiig, professor emerita of Boston University and president of the Knowledge Research Institute, presented on “The New Face of CELF-4: A Test for Many Reasons.” Wiig is author/co-author of the CELF series of language tests (e.g., CELF-4, CELF Preschool) and other language assessment products and texts. She discussed the rationales for revising and updating the CELF; the components, content, and purposes of core and supplementary sub-tests and performance-based observations; and the statistical characteristics of the test and implications for eligibility determinations, differential diagnosis, and program planning.

  • Judy K. Montgomery, associate professor in special education in Chapman University’s School of Education in Orange, CA, presented on “Developing Classroom Literacy.” She discussed why the new federal “No Child Left Behind Act” requires collaboration and specifically targeted six phonological strategies that can be used when collaborating with teachers on literacy goals for students. Montgomery was recently appointed to the California Reading First Advisory Panel by the governor of California.

  • Barbara Moore-Brown, director of special and alternative education for the El Rancho Unified School District in Pico Rivera, CA, presented on “Trends and Legislative Focus: SLPs’ Service Delivery Responds.” She explained why service delivery practices have changed in the school setting and highlighted the evolution of new roles and responsibilities related to current education reforms in public schools. Moore-Brown is co-author with Montgomery of Making a Difference for America’s Children: Speech-Language Pathologists in Public Schools (2001).

  • Kathleen T. Williams, vice president for product development for AGS Publishing, presented a workshop on “Ten Things You Need to Know About Standardized Testing.” She talked about differentiating a test from an assessment, distinguishing standardized from non-standardized procedures, defining common but often confused psychometric terms, and increasing participants’ “consumer” knowledge for choosing appropriate tests.

“As with last year’s presentation, this conference provided a spiritual uplifting and healing for those of us in New York City who experienced the devastating effects and assault on our city and freedom,” Geffner said. “It sent a message to us that our professionals and our commercial vendors support us and care about us and the work we do. This spirit of solidarity, the weaving together of all of us from diverse backgrounds, and the sharing together brought harmony indeed.”
“This conference was considered a ‘gift,’ and the members of the Higher Education Opportunities for Speech Providers Committee and those who attended are extremely grateful for the generosity of spirit, goodness of heart, and the considerate actions of so many wonderful people who brought it to fruition,” Coyle added.
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March 2003
Volume 8, Issue 4