ASHA Adopts AIT Policy ASHA has adopted a new position statement and technical report addressing auditory integration therapy (AIT), also known as auditory enhancement training and audio-psycho-phonology. The position statement was developed by the ASHA Working Group on Auditory Integration Training, approved by the Legislative Council at its spring meeting, and ratified by the ... ASHA News
Free
ASHA News  |   August 01, 2003
ASHA Adopts AIT Policy
Author Notes
Article Information
ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   August 01, 2003
ASHA Adopts AIT Policy
The ASHA Leader, August 2003, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.AN.08142003.3
The ASHA Leader, August 2003, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.AN.08142003.3
ASHA has adopted a new position statement and technical report addressing auditory integration therapy (AIT), also known as auditory enhancement training and audio-psycho-phonology. The position statement was developed by the ASHA Working Group on Auditory Integration Training, approved by the Legislative Council at its spring meeting, and ratified by the Executive Board. Visit ASHA’s Web site to access both new documents.
After a careful review of available research findings gathered after years of experience with AIT, the Working Group on Auditory Integration Training did not find sufficient evidence that AIT improves the behavior of individuals who undergo this procedure. Therefore, the working group concluded that AIT does not meet scientific standards for efficacy that would justify its practice by audiologists and speech-language pathologists. This position is now the Association’s official policy on AIT.
In light of this policy, individuals practicing AIT, and those considering doing so, should carefully consider the implications the position statement has on their ethical responsibilities, particularly Principle of Ethics I, Rule G, of the Code of Ethics: “Individuals shall evaluate the effectiveness of services rendered and of products dispensed and shall provide services or dispense products only when benefit can reasonably be expected.”
ASHA’s new AIT position statement, which is now the Association’s policy, supports additional research on AIT. The working group encourages well-designed, institutionally approved research protocols to assess the effectiveness and safety of AIT, and recommends that the Association’s position on AIT be re-examined if further scientific studies support its efficacy.
Ethical determinations, of course, must be assessed considering all of the particular facts and circumstances. However, with the exception of research as discussed above, ASHA members and certificate holders may be found in violation of the Code of Ethics if they provide services, such as AIT, for which there is no reasonable expectation of benefit. This is particularly so where, as here, official Association policy confirms the lack of expected benefit.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2003
Volume 8, Issue 14