Battle, Kent, Aungst, and Davidson Elected to Executive Board Four outstanding volunteer leaders—Dolores Battle, Ray Kent, Roberta Aungst and Stephanie Davidson—have won election to the ASHA Executive Board following elections that ended in mid-September. Taken together, they represent a total of 134 years of membership in and commitment to the Association. On Jan. 1, 2004, the new EB members ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   October 01, 2003
Battle, Kent, Aungst, and Davidson Elected to Executive Board
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   October 01, 2003
Battle, Kent, Aungst, and Davidson Elected to Executive Board
The ASHA Leader, October 2003, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.AN.08182003.3
The ASHA Leader, October 2003, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.AN.08182003.3
Four outstanding volunteer leaders—Dolores Battle, Ray Kent, Roberta Aungst and Stephanie Davidson—have won election to the ASHA Executive Board following elections that ended in mid-September. Taken together, they represent a total of 134 years of membership in and commitment to the Association.
On Jan. 1, 2004, the new EB members will take office in the following positions: Battle, 2004 president-elect; Kent, vice president for research and technology, 2004–2006; Aungst, vice president for professional practices in audiology, 2004–2006; and Davidson, vice president for academic affairs, 2004–2006.
The newly elected officers spoke with The ASHA Leader about their goals, key challenges facing the professions, and their dedication to volunteer service through ASHA.
As next year’s president-elect, Dolores Battle says she will maintain the course toward achieving ASHA’s ongoing goals and priorities in a time of change. “Next year will be different for ASHA from others in the recent past,” said Battle, professor of speech-language pathology and senior advisor to the president for equity and campus diversity at Buffalo State College.
“Not only will we have new members in leadership positions, but we’ll also have a new executive director in the National Office,” she said.
The 2004 national U.S. elections will be critical, she said. “We need to continue to be watchful of the governmental and legislative issues that impact our professions,” Battle said, adding that emerging as well as current issues need to be monitored.
As a volunteer, she has received “so much in return” for her service to ASHA, especially the opportunity “to know wonderful people, and to grow in so many ways,” she said. “It’s hard to imagine what I would be doing and where I would be without my commitment to a life of volunteer service.”
Ray Kent views the current PhD shortage as one of the top challenges in the area of research and technology, and also plans to expand efforts to increase the scientific base of the professions.
“We need to use technology to meet the needs of our teachers, researchers, clinicians, and students, and to find effective ways to use it in our everyday lives,” said Kent, a professor of communicative disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “It’s also important to explore innovative ways to utilize technology for many purposes, including some we haven’t yet imagined.”
In the area of research, he described “two prongs” to strengthen ASHA’s science base— “basic research into the fundamental mechanisms of speech, language, and hearing, as well as more clinical research.” A growing body of evidence-based research will help build “a database that will continue to give us more effective procedures in the clinic,” he said.
Kent has enjoyed volunteering on behalf of the professions through ASHA. “It is very rewarding to work with people with high energy, high enthusiasm, and who are willing to give their time to support the Association. The volunteers in ASHA have really made it an effective organization, probably in more ways than any of us realize.”
As incoming vice president for professional practices in audiology, Roberta Aungst, an audiology consultant, brings the perspective of more than 40 years of experience as a clinical service provider and clinical supervisor as she seeks to move audiology forward in the academic arena, the professional association arena, and in the credentialing and licensing arena.
Aungst plans to continue development of the shared governance process, consult with audiologists in all work settings and with ASHA staff to continue evaluating the evolving scope of audiology practice, and continue working with state associations to recruit those who are not currently ASHA members.
As a volunteer for almost her entire adult life, Aungst deeply enjoys working for a cause. “We all have different skills and knowledge and putting it all together can be an incredible achievement—be it establishing a foundation, raising money for a charity, or developing a program,” she said. “In addition, you meet the most fantastic people. Many of my best friends are those that I have met as a volunteer.”
Stephanie Davidson, the incoming vice president for academic affairs, looks forward to working to “address shortages in the numbers of undergraduate students, doctoral students, and doctoral faculty, and to ensuring high standards for academic programs.” Davidson is an audiologist and associate professor of speech and hearing science at Ohio State University.
Davidson noted two challenges for audiologists—the transition of audiology from a master’s-level to a doctoral-level profession, and the shortage of PhD students and faculty. The change to a doctoral-level credential “poses enormous challenges for academic programs that want to continue professional training and for students choosing audiology as a career path.” The PhD shortage “must be addressed to prevent the erosion of the scientific base of our discipline and the quality of education of our students.”
Her volunteer experience at ASHA has provided a breadth of knowledge about academic and professional issues, but she says the greatest joy has been “the ability to meet and develop friendships with colleagues across the country.”
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October 2003
Volume 8, Issue 18