Minority Student Leadership Program Celebrates Five Years The Minority Student Leadership Program (MSLP), established in 1999 to foster leadership development for racial/ethnic minority students, celebrated its fifth year at the 2003 ASHA Convention. Since 1999, the program has served 148 students by helping them gain insight into their leadership skills, providing them a better understanding of how ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   February 01, 2004
Minority Student Leadership Program Celebrates Five Years
Author Notes
  • Melanie Johnson, is ASHA’s membership program manager. Contact her by e-mail at mjohnson@asha.org.
    Melanie Johnson, is ASHA’s membership program manager. Contact her by e-mail at mjohnson@asha.org.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   February 01, 2004
Minority Student Leadership Program Celebrates Five Years
The ASHA Leader, February 2004, Vol. 9, 3-22. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.09022004.3
The ASHA Leader, February 2004, Vol. 9, 3-22. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.09022004.3
The Minority Student Leadership Program (MSLP), established in 1999 to foster leadership development for racial/ethnic minority students, celebrated its fifth year at the 2003 ASHA Convention. Since 1999, the program has served 148 students by helping them gain insight into their leadership skills, providing them a better understanding of how leaders affect change in their professional association, and empowering them to take risks and meet their own challenges.
Former and current MSLP participants have exhibited leadership in a variety of ways and have achieved many successes. For example, one student received a full scholarship and a $10,000 stipend to pursue her doctoral degree; another is a director of a medical center’s speech-language pathology program; several participants received scholarships from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation; some were recipients of the ASHA Minority Student Travel Award (in conjunction with the Annual Research Symposium); and others have been appointed to serve on ASHA boards and committees, such as the Council for Clinical Certification.
Minority Student Leadership Mentoring Program
One of the goals of the MSLP is to provide networking opportunities and resources to enhance the professional development of the student leaders. In 2001, the Minority Student Leadership Mentoring Program was launched to provide peer mentoring and one-on-one mentoring by an Association leader. A Web site has been developed that gives the student leaders a chance to communicate with each other and Association leaders concerning topics and issues that are relevant to them.
Mentors serve in two roles: as individual mentors to student leaders and as guest mentors. Guest mentors provide career-related support by leading a group discussion on the MSLP Web site on a topic related to their area of expertise. The student leaders then have a chance to ask questions and receive an expert opinion on the topic. Association leaders that have served as guest mentors include Luis Riquelme-Figuring Out What It Means to Lead; Sue Hale-The National Exam; and Julie Masterson-Putting Theory to Practical Use.
In commemoration of “The Year of the Volunteer” a breakfast was held at the 2003 Convention to honor the more than 100 volunteers who have provided service to the MSLP from 1999–2003. A special award was given to Luis Riquelme as the MSLP’s Most Valuable Volunteer. Riquelme, who has volunteered with the MSLP every year since its inception, has served in each volunteer capacity for the program, including application reviewer, speaker, mentor, and guest mentor.
A Most Valuable Experience

I was thrilled to receive the Most Valuable Volunteer award from the MSLP at the ASHA Convention in Chicago. I was particularly happy to see several of the past participants now working in the field and making a difference. The students’ energy is inspiring, and the stories they share from around the country remind us all of how much we still need to do.

I will say that, as a volunteer, the role I enjoyed most was being the first online guest mentor. It was an honor to have been asked and a challenge to make it work. The mentoring put me in touch with all current and past participants in the MSLP. The topic was leadership, and the stories I heard and read were incredible. It was an amazing opportunity to share with all participants my personal thoughts on emerging leadership, on leadership styles, and on some of the reality-based fears one faces when taking on leadership roles.

I must thank Patricia Cole Holliday, Melanie Johnson, and Vicki Deal-Williams for all their hard work and dedication to this project. I also thank them for asking me to be a part of it. It’s been a journey I will never forget. Students are our future; leaders and volunteers are our path to that future.

-Luis Riquelme

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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2004
Volume 9, Issue 2