The National Center for Speech-Language Pathology in Schools The National Center for Speech-Language Pathology in Schools (NCSLPS) is a resource Web site that is currently funded by a Project of National Significance grant from the U.S. Department of Education and is a collaborative partnership between the University of Cincinnati and Miami University of Ohio. NCSLPS (www.uc.edu/ncslps) was designed ... Features
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Features  |   September 01, 2004
The National Center for Speech-Language Pathology in Schools
Author Notes
  • Nancy A. Creaghead, a former ASHA president, is professor and head of the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is the principal investigator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at nancy.creaghead@uc.edu.
    Nancy A. Creaghead, a former ASHA president, is professor and head of the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is the principal investigator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at nancy.creaghead@uc.edu.×
  • Ann Glaser, is an assistant professor in the speech pathology and audiology department at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. She is an instructional coordinator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at annglaser@aol.com.
    Ann Glaser, is an assistant professor in the speech pathology and audiology department at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. She is an instructional coordinator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at annglaser@aol.com.×
  • Jo-Anne Prendeville, is an associate professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is an instructional coordinator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at jo-anne.prendeville@uc.edu.
    Jo-Anne Prendeville, is an associate professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is an instructional coordinator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at jo-anne.prendeville@uc.edu.×
  • Wayne A. Secord, is the Provost’s Distinguished Service Professor in communicative disorders at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. The author of numerous assessment and intervention programs, he developed the project and wrote the grant proposal to the U.S. Department of Education for funding the NCSLPS. Contact him at wsecord@mail.ucf.edu.
    Wayne A. Secord, is the Provost’s Distinguished Service Professor in communicative disorders at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. The author of numerous assessment and intervention programs, he developed the project and wrote the grant proposal to the U.S. Department of Education for funding the NCSLPS. Contact him at wsecord@mail.ucf.edu.×
  • Linda L. Wellman, is a doctoral candidate in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is the data and research coordinator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at wellmal@email.uc.edu.
    Linda L. Wellman, is a doctoral candidate in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is the data and research coordinator for the NCSLPS. Contact her at wellmal@email.uc.edu.×
  • Stacy L. Williams, is an instructional technology consultant in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is the instructional technology coordinator and Webmaster for the NCSLPS. Contact her at ncslps@zoomtown.com.
    Stacy L. Williams, is an instructional technology consultant in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Cincinnati. She is the instructional technology coordinator and Webmaster for the NCSLPS. Contact her at ncslps@zoomtown.com.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Features
Features   |   September 01, 2004
The National Center for Speech-Language Pathology in Schools
The ASHA Leader, September 2004, Vol. 9, 11-53. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR4.09172004.11
The ASHA Leader, September 2004, Vol. 9, 11-53. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR4.09172004.11
The National Center for Speech-Language Pathology in Schools (NCSLPS) is a resource Web site that is currently funded by a Project of National Significance grant from the U.S. Department of Education and is a collaborative partnership between the University of Cincinnati and Miami University of Ohio. NCSLPS (www.uc.edu/ncslps) was designed as a virtual education and research center to support speech-language pathologists in response to the 1997 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA gave tudents with disabilities greater educational opportunities as well as redefined the responsibilities of the SLP to include a diversity of roles such as co-teacher, team member, collaborator/consultant, and developer of curricular adaptations and modifications.
A primary focus of IDEA ’97 is the establishment of an educational planning process to promote meaningful access to the general education curriculum for all students. This process requires professionals working with students with special needs to understand and apply knowledge in the areas of authentic assessment, curriculum-based intervention, and collaborative IEP planning. The online presentations in these three areas are available for continuing education units (CEUs), and provide a valuable resource for ASHA’s school-based members, especially in light of the fact that effective Jan. 1, 2005, ASHA will require continuing professional development for maintenance of SLPs’ certification (for detailed information on the professional development requirement for maintaining ASHA certification, call 800-498-2071, or send an e-mail to CCCMaintenance@asha.org). An important part of the NCSLPS’s continuing education (CE) efforts is providing CE accessibility to school-based SLPs in areas where CE is not readily available.
An Interest in Distance Learning
A 1999 study conducted by Helfer (“What Do Audiologist’s Really Want?” American Journal of Audiology 8[1], 6-12) examined the interest level and willingness of licensed clinicians to use distance education in the future as a means to earn CE credit. Her findings demonstrated that over half of the people surveyed demonstrated a desire for the creation and implementation of distance education programs. She concluded that working clinicians prefer to use the least disruptive method possible to obtain necessary information for CEU requirements and additional coursework. Distance education is currently the fastest growing area of education worldwide (see Open Learning Agency [1992]. Lifelong learning and human resource development [ERIC, ED 364771]. Burnaby, British Columbia: British Columbian Human Resource Development Project).
The NCSLPS uses an innovative instructional design model from Olcott’s general principles for effective distance education and offers a variety of delivery methods to meet the needs of every learner (see Olcott, D., et al. [1999]). Teaching at a distance: A handbook for instructors. Mission Viejo, CA: Archipelago Productions & League for Innovation in the Community College). The NCSLPS is self-paced, requires high levels of participation/interaction from its users, provides constant technical support, uses “real life” practical examples to apply new knowledge, and provides a supportive learning environment. The goal of this online learning program is to provide new information about current and innovative practices in the schools as well as resources to support these practices and the opportunity for interaction with other SLPs nationwide.
As a virtual resource, the NCSLPS houses a library within its Web site including over 80 abstracts for books and articles that are organized into the following topic areas: authentic assessment, curriculum-based intervention, dynamic assessment, IDEA, observation, portfolios, reading/writing/literacy, and spelling. Full-length articles and book chapters are available upon request if they have been provided by the publisher.
There are also online discussions and e-mail discussion forums on a variety of topics ranging from autism and other specific disorders to general school-based issues. An “Ask the Expert” link, when complete, will highlight a speaker for the month that will be available to respond to questions and comments on a specified topic. Responses from the expert will be archived so that all users will be able to review the material.
Currently, two interactive newsletters have been published on the Web site that SLPs and other school professionals can customize and distribute to their staff and families for additional information regarding school-based speech and language topics. This newsletter is available in an “edit” format as well as “read only.” The newsletters will be available on a monthly basis. Links to electronic journals, curriculum and personnel standards for every state, and over 300 other school-based resources are also available online.
In addition, the Web site includes downloadable documents such as checklists and forms for SLPs and other school-based professionals to use in their work setting. Examples of innovative interventions and service delivery are provided for SLPs to incorporate into their work setting as well.
Current Web Site Presentation Series
One of the main resources of the NCSLPS is the series of multimedia presentations. These are divided into three categories or umbrellas: Performance Assessment, Curriculum-based Intervention, and Collaborative IEP Planning.
The presentations within the umbrella of Performance Assessment focus on evaluation that includes collecting authentic assessment information that is representative of the student’s strengths and weaknesses and relevant to the general education curriculum. Specific procedures to collect and integrate this information are found within the following performance assessment presentations: “Assessment Overview” by Sally Disney, “Assessment Vis-à-vis IDEA” by Kathleen Whitmire, “Issues in Assessment” by Elena Plante, “Checklists” by Gina Goodin, “Observations” by Linda Wellman, “Portfolios” by Ann Glaser, “Narrative Assessment” by Ron Gillam, and “Ethnographic Interviewing” by Carol Westby.
The Curriculum-based Intervention umbrella offers presentations pertaining to linking performance assessment to intervention that is relevant to and directly related to the curriculum as well as local and state standards. Converting local/state standards and curriculum standards into relevant communication/language intervention is covered within the school curriculum presentations: “Negotiating Classroom Discourse” by Nancy Creaghead, “Prescriptive Spelling Assessment & Performance-Based Word Study Instruction” by Kenn Apel and Jan Wasowicz, “Phonological Intervention for Students With Learning Disabilities” by Judy Montgomery, and “Curriculum-Relevant Therapy With Adolescents” by Barbara Ehren.
As mandated by IDEA ’97, students with disabilities are to be provided meaningful access to the general education curriculum. It is critical that IEP planning be in the context of the general education curriculum, as well as conforms to local and state standards. Planning educationally relevant IEPs is a collaborative team process and must be culturally sensitive. The third umbrella of the NCSLPS Web site presentations, Collaborative IEP Planning, moves through the progression from evaluation to IEP planning.
Relevant IEPs
The information from these presentations can help guide school-based SLPs through the process of developing relevant IEPs that integrate the student’s strengths and weaknesses within the context of the general education curriculum and state standards while being sensitive to and incorporating cultural and linguistic diversity. Techniques for recognizing patterns of errors from the evaluation and relating these patterns to state performance objectives and the general education curriculum will define and guide the development of collaborative and educationally relevant IEP goals.
To keep this IEP planning process in perspective, it is important to keep in mind that IEPs are to be developed and written within a team, defined as two or more people with a common goal or focus. Each IEP goal must be measurable and have baseline data from interdisciplinary assessment information and be aligned with the curriculum and state standards. Presentations in the Collaborative IEP Planning umbrella include: “From Evaluation to IEP” by Signe Stitt, “The ABCs of IEPs” by Diane Eger, “Developing Cross Cultural Communicative Competence” by Li-Rong Lilly Cheng, “Communication Functions and State Tests” by Leslie Holzhauser-Peters & Diana Husemann, and “Testing-Based Education Reforms” by Monica Gordon-Pershey.
Future Web Site Presentation Series
The NCSLPS is committed to supporting SLPs on a wide range of relevant issues. In addition to the three main umbrellas of presentation, more series are currently being developed. A presentation series on literacy is being sponsored by The Ohio Master’s Network Initiatives in Education-Speech Language Pathology (OMNIE Project) in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Education. The OMNIE project’s goal is to collaboratively develop and deliver distance-learning continuing education in the area of literacy to SLPs, teachers, early interventionists, other professionals, and families in Ohio and throughout the nation. Topics to be included in the literacy presentation series are: emerging literacy and language development, phonological awareness and phonological disorders, technology and text-based literacy, improving narrative abilities of school-aged children, and implementing research-based language and literacy intervention for children with moderate to severe special needs.
An umbrella that addresses appropriate services to children from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds will include the following presentations: “Performance Based Assessment for Students with Disabilities who are English Language Learning (ELL)” by Alex Brice, “Cultural Competence for Working with Families from Diverse Backgrounds” by Janice Wright, “Assessing the Language Skills of Children from African American English (AAE) Speaking Backgrounds” by Toya Wyatt, and “The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Serving the Needs of Children who are English Language Learners” by Brian Goldstein.
An audiology presentation series will include such topics as: review of audiological evaluation procedures, dynamic and formal language/communication assessment, principles of intervention, managing the classroom environment for speech reception, and hearing assistive technology appropriate to school environments.
Other presentation series topics to be developed include: autism, No Child Left Behind, and augmentative communication devices and their application. We welcome other suggestions for presentations and/or speakers. For further information, visit our Web site at: www.uc.edu/ncslps. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, please e-mail the NCSLPS at ncslps@zoomtown.com.
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September 2004
Volume 9, Issue 17