Science at Work Research is the process that underlies the asking and answering of questions, as well as the answers from observations made during such processes. Its importance to the field of communication sciences and disorders cannot be overstated. Indeed research and scientific inquiry have served as the foundation of clinical practice and ... Features
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Features  |   December 01, 2004
Science at Work
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Special Populations / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Features
Features   |   December 01, 2004
Science at Work
The ASHA Leader, December 2004, Vol. 9, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR1.09222004.4
The ASHA Leader, December 2004, Vol. 9, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR1.09222004.4
Research is the process that underlies the asking and answering of questions, as well as the answers from observations made during such processes. Its importance to the field of communication sciences and disorders cannot be overstated. Indeed research and scientific inquiry have served as the foundation of clinical practice and building blocks for our professions for over 75 years. They have led-and continue to lead-to greater knowledge about specific problems encountered during the course of the clinical experience. In this issue we offer you specific examples of science at work-in the area of rehabilitation and habilitation for communication disorders.
Each of the following segments offers a snapshot of how the research process is used to link theory with practice.
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December 2004
Volume 9, Issue 22