Audiology Doctoral Program Enhanced The University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders and the Boys Town National Research Hospital have entered into a cooperative agreement designed to enhance doctoral education in audiology. Under the agreement, scientists from Boys Town will join the UNL faculty as adjunct professors in the Department ... Academic Edge
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Academic Edge  |   September 01, 2004
Audiology Doctoral Program Enhanced
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Hearing Disorders / Academic Edge
Academic Edge   |   September 01, 2004
Audiology Doctoral Program Enhanced
The ASHA Leader, September 2004, Vol. 9, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.AE.09162004.3
The ASHA Leader, September 2004, Vol. 9, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.AE.09162004.3
The University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders and the Boys Town National Research Hospital have entered into a cooperative agreement designed to enhance doctoral education in audiology.
Under the agreement, scientists from Boys Town will join the UNL faculty as adjunct professors in the Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, a division of the College of Education and Human Sciences housed in the Barkley Memorial Center on East Campus. That arrangement will give UNL doctoral students in audiology the advantage of instruction from scientists holding grants from the National Institutes of Health, and also the opportunity to work in the research laboratories and audiology clinics at Boys Town.
UNL has the only program in Nebraska for the preparation of audiologists. The program has offered the PhD degree for many years and has been crucial in providing the majority of audiologists who practice in Nebraska. University faculty said the agreement with Boys Town provides the program with an excellent opportunity for additional growth.
The agreement will help the university prepare students for leadership roles at a critical time in the profession, said T. Newell Decker, UNL professor of special education and communication disorders. “While the number of scientists training in audiology programs in the United States is at an all-time low, the need for such individuals is at an all-time high.”
Decker said his department has added a doctor of audiology (AuD) degree that would be the entry level for the practice of audiology. It replaces the master’s degree in audiology at UNL.
John Bernthal, professor and chair of the Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, said that under the agreement, UNL doctoral students will get clinical and laboratory research experience in their first two years in the program. After that, they would have to declare for either the PhD or the AuD degree.
Bernthal, who also serves as director of the Barkley Center, said another advantage of the agreement is its cost-effectiveness.
“At a time of financial crunch, this allows us to do something significant in improving our program without a major influx of resources.”
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September 2004
Volume 9, Issue 16