Senate Staffers Undergo Hearing Screenings Towson University speech-language pathology graduate students with Bud, the decibel-detecting dummy at the Senate Health Fair. Graduate students conducted hearing screenings, and ASHA staff tested the decibel levels of personal music players at the annual U.S. Senate Health Fair in October. More than 700 Senate employees visited the two-day ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   November 01, 2011
Senate Staffers Undergo Hearing Screenings
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Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   November 01, 2011
Senate Staffers Undergo Hearing Screenings
The ASHA Leader, November 2011, Vol. 16, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.AN3.16152011.39
The ASHA Leader, November 2011, Vol. 16, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.AN3.16152011.39
Towson University speech-language pathology graduate students with Bud, the decibel-detecting dummy at the Senate Health Fair.
Graduate students conducted hearing screenings, and ASHA staff tested the decibel levels of personal music players at the annual U.S. Senate Health Fair in October.
More than 700 Senate employees visited the two-day fair, which featured exhibits from a variety of health-related organizations. In addition to providing testing, ASHA distributed free ear plugs and consumer literature and answered questions about speech-language and hearing services.
Graduate students from George Washington University, Gallaudet University, University of Maryland, and Towson University screened 63 people, of whom 37 failed. Students and faculty advisors counseled those who failed the screening on follow-up steps to ensure their hearing health.
ASHA staff conducted a value-added lunch program for participating students and faculty as part of ASHA’s federal advocacy program, “Speak Out, Be Heard.” The program briefed participants on current congressional activities affecting the professions, as well as the importance of student and member grassroots participation in the legislative process.
“Bud,” the decibel-detecting dummy, drew a number of fair-goers who wanted to know if they were playing their MP3 players too loudly. A decibel meter placed inside “Bud”—decked out in a “Listen to Your Buds” T-shirt, ASHA cap, and sunglasses—measures the volume from earbuds placed in the dummy’s ears.
ASHA has participated in the annual Senate Health Fair for 10 years, promoting ASHA members and their services to congressional staff and raising awareness of the association and communication disorders. Exposing staff to the name, logo, literature, and services of ASHA and its members increases general awareness and familiarity among congressional staff.
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November 2011
Volume 16, Issue 15