New California Credential The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing’s (CTC) new language and academic development (LAD) teacher credential regulations were adopted into law August 2011. Search asha.org; there are NO results regarding this major change to our profession. The e-mail response I received from the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s leaders stated: ASHA and CSHA’s ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   September 01, 2012
New California Credential
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Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   September 01, 2012
New California Credential
The ASHA Leader, September 2012, Vol. 17, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.IN5.17112012.36
The ASHA Leader, September 2012, Vol. 17, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.IN5.17112012.36
The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing’s (CTC) new language and academic development (LAD) teacher credential regulations were adopted into law August 2011. Search asha.org; there are NO results regarding this major change to our profession. The e-mail response I received from the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s leaders stated: ASHA and CSHA’s leadership were actively involved in all negotiations and deemed this new teacher category to be an acceptable (and best possible) compromise. Wow! We already have a professional crisis with staff shortages nationwide. How much time, energy, and monetary resources are being spent on recruitment campaigns? If teachers begin doing our jobs, why would students pursue a degree in speech-language pathology?
Watch the CTC webinar, read the FAQs, and judge for yourself. There are eight LAD standards: Characteristics of Students with Communication Needs, Language Development, Assessment and Evaluation of Language Skills, Academic Assessment and Instruction, Planning and Implementing Curriculum and Instruction, Literacy Instruction, Social/Pragmatic/Communication Skills, and Behavior Based Teaching Strategies. Anyone else see a conflict? You may think I sound like an alarmist, but four of these eight are in my scope of practice!
It really seems to me, as much as the presenters emphatically state (maybe too much) that these LAD teachers are NOT replacing SLPs, that this entire plan was developed to mitigate the SLP shortage, and in the process, whether intended or not, put SLPs out of work—oh, except for articulation, voice, and fluency (they did say that, over and over again!).
Maryann Potts Redding, California
Editor’s note: The five-year history of this issue is complex. See the upcoming Oct. 9 issue for a full explanation of efforts by CSHA and ASHA to work with the California Teaching Commission, an independent decision-making body, on this compromise.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
September 2012
Volume 17, Issue 11