Therapeutic Presence “Looking at—and Along—Communication Disorders” by Matthew H. Rouse (July 31), encouraging clinicians to relate more empathically, alludes to the key matter of therapeutic presence, our contribution to the tone and functionality of the relationship we cultivate with clients, caregivers, and colleagues. Focusing on being genuinely empathic can help us establish ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   September 01, 2012
Therapeutic Presence
Author Notes
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Inbox
Inbox   |   September 01, 2012
Therapeutic Presence
The ASHA Leader, September 2012, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.17112012.2
The ASHA Leader, September 2012, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.17112012.2
Looking at—and Along—Communication Disorders” by Matthew H. Rouse (July 31), encouraging clinicians to relate more empathically, alludes to the key matter of therapeutic presence, our contribution to the tone and functionality of the relationship we cultivate with clients, caregivers, and colleagues. Focusing on being genuinely empathic can help us establish and monitor the extent to which our presence leads to satisfying clinical service. And being so stems from our awareness that what we do has the potential to help others live more personally meaningful and joyous lives, something we are more likely to actualize as we cultivate our ability to calmly and thoughtfully engage as we work together.
We know as patients and clients that we are more likely to relate with candor—sharing aspects of our stories that can help heal us more thoroughly and more efficiently—when we interact with professionals who listen with interest and respect to our expression of need and desire. Our clients, too, are likely to engage more fully to benefit more completely when we display—through grooming, attire, movement, posture, use of personal space, attention, eye contact, physical touch, word, rate of speech, tone of voice, intensity of voice, and silence—a presence that is welcoming, encouraging and healing.
Cultivating our therapeutic presence enhances our ability to be and feel useful and valued as professionals, reducing the likelihood we may succumb to compassion fatigue and jettison a career we sought and worked so hard to establish.
Ellen-Marie Silverman Milwaukee, Wisconsin
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
September 2012
Volume 17, Issue 11