Unveiling the Future: ASHA Dedicates Green Building More than 300 ASHA members, staff, and special guests gathered to dedicate and celebrate ASHA’s new “green” national office at 2200 Research Boulevard in Rockville, Maryland. Before unveiling a commemorative marker at the March 27 event, ASHA President Kate Gottfred noted that ASHA members help others with the most essential ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   May 01, 2008
Unveiling the Future: ASHA Dedicates Green Building
Author Notes
  • Dee Naquin Shafer, an assistant managing editor of The ASHA Leader, can be reached at dshafer@asha.org.
    Dee Naquin Shafer, an assistant managing editor of The ASHA Leader, can be reached at dshafer@asha.org.×
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ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   May 01, 2008
Unveiling the Future: ASHA Dedicates Green Building
The ASHA Leader, May 2008, Vol. 13, 3-13. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.13062008.3
The ASHA Leader, May 2008, Vol. 13, 3-13. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.13062008.3
More than 300 ASHA members, staff, and special guests gathered to dedicate and celebrate ASHA’s new “green” national office at 2200 Research Boulevard in Rockville, Maryland.
Before unveiling a commemorative marker at the March 27 event, ASHA President Kate Gottfred noted that ASHA members help others with the most essential human ability—communication.
“ASHA members leave a positive mark on people’s lives,” she said. “This morning we are going to leave a mark too, one that’s reflective of the critical differences our members make.”
The commemorative stone will be displayed at the entrance to the building.
“This joyous day has been several years in the making,” Arlene Pietranton, ASHA executive director, told the crowd. “It’s a celebration of our commitment to the culture of responsible citizenship and cultural competence, which are part of the very fiber of who we are.”
Festivities began with a song from the Multicultural Heritage Singers, a group of children from St. Catherine Laboure School in Wheaton, Maryland. They sang “Tomorrow Needs Us,” with opening lyrics appropriate for ASHA:

I am just one person but I know it will matter when I make the changes that I know could help the world.

The group includes 21 students and represents 15 nations.
Accolades and Applause
ASHA members can be proud of the new building for many reasons, Gottfred said. The need for a larger building signifies how ASHA membership is growing, and she asked past presidents and board members to stand for a round of applause. Next she recognized the committee members in attendance.
“Being an audiologist, a speech-language pathologist, or a speech, language, or hearing scientist is a labor of love—our ranks aren’t bursting with millionaires,” she said. “So when ASHA members pay precious dollars in dues to ASHA, they have every right to know that they are getting a good value in return.”
The building is a striking example of good value, she said, pointing out that it was built on time and under budget.
“I particularly like that the building’s address is on Research Boulevard. The word ‘research’ is synonymous with ASHA,” said the building’s architect, Joseph Boggs, of Boggs & Partners Architects (Annapolis, Maryland).
“This new building shows that ASHA takes social responsibility very seriously,” said Susan Sarfati, president and CEO of the Center for Association Leadership and executive vice president of the American Society of Association Executives. She listed examples of ASHA’s commitment to social responsibility, such as its volunteer programs and Earth Day celebrations. It has also created a good business model with the new green building, which will save operational funds, she added.
“[The building] is just one reason We’re so proud of ASHA,” said Kathleen Matthews, executive vice president of global communications and public affairs with Marriott International (Bethesda, Maryland). “When it comes to values it is so important to walk the walk—as well as talk the talk.”
She praised ASHA’s commitment to environmental responsibility. The new building uses less energy and “green” buildings tend to attract the best and the brightest employees, Matthews said, adding, “This building has set a benchmark for the rest of us.”
Pietranton accepted a certificate celebrating the building dedication. Pradeep Ganguly, director of the Montgomery County Office of Economic Development, presented the certificate, noting that in Hindu, the word “asha” means “hope.”
Karen McManus from the office of U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) presented a certificate to Gottfred recognizing ASHA’s leadership.
“Today is also a celebration of the commitment of hundreds of thousands of members and staff whose vision, talents, and dedication have led and energized our organization over its 80-plus years,” Pietranton said. “This represents the story of how the building came to be and our vision for the future and the future of our professions.”
The event concluded with a luncheon and office tours for the visitors.
“Pictures do not do the new building justice,” said Linda Gregory, a visiting Speech-Language Pathology Advisory Council member from Kentucky. “The old building was really nice, but when I saw this one from a distance, it took my breath away.”
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May 2008
Volume 13, Issue 6