Audiology in Brief Physical education teachers often shout instructions over noise, hoping that students will hear and understand. Teachers’ efforts to make themselves heard contribute to the managerial time spent on activities unrelated to gym—roll call, getting out equipment, giving directions, and organizing teams—that could be reduced by the use of sound ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   May 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   May 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, May 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14072009.5
The ASHA Leader, May 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14072009.5
Sound Field Systems in Gym Class
Physical education teachers often shout instructions over noise, hoping that students will hear and understand. Teachers’ efforts to make themselves heard contribute to the managerial time spent on activities unrelated to gym—roll call, getting out equipment, giving directions, and organizing teams—that could be reduced by the use of sound field systems in schools, according to a study in the April issue of the Journal of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools (LSHSS).
The research involved two middle-school gym classes (one inner-city and one rural) during outdoor volleyball, soccer, and tennis and in the locker rooms. Using a multiple-baseline design, the study found an overall decrease in the managerial time at the beginning of class with the introduction of sound field systems.
According to study author Stu Ryan of the University of West Florida in Pensacola, the findings indicate the “immediate need for administrators to determine the most appropriate, cost-effective procedure to support sound field amplification in existing physical education settings.” To read the study, visit the LSHSS Web site.
Effective Smoke Alarms
When a fire breaks out, people who are hard of hearing rely on fire alarms with auditory, visual, or tactile signals, and the Americans with Disabilities Act requires strobe lights in hotel rooms to provide emergency notification. The February 2009 issue of Ear and Hearing features the first study to compare the waking effectiveness of a variety of alerting signals at a range of intensities.
Researchers Dorothy Bruck and Ian Thomas at Victoria University in Australia compared three auditory signals—a bed-shaker, a pillow-shaker, and strobe lights—presented to 38 adults with bilateral mild-to-moderately severe hearing losses of 25 dB to 70 dB when they were in deep sleep. A low-pitched 520-Hz square wave auditory signal emitted by a fire alarm new to the market was the most effective, waking 92% of participants at 75 dBA. The current high-pitched 3100-Hz smoke alarm woke 56% of participants at 75 dBA. Bed- and pillow-shakers woke 80%–84% of study participants at the intensity level set by the manufacturers, and the strobe lights woke only 27% of participants at an intensity above the U.S. standard. For an abstract of the study visit the Ear and Hearing Web site.
Arkansas Hearing Aid Mandate
Arkansas now requires insurers to provide coverage for hearing aids of no less than $1,400 per ear every three years with no age limit. When the bill takes effect Jan. 1, 2010, Arkansas will join 11 states that require insurance coverage for hearing aids, although most states provide coverage only for children.
In 2008 Colorado, Delaware, and New Jersey enacted hearing aid mandates, and several other states have legislative mandates pending before their legislatures. For more information, contact Rend Al-Mondhiry, ASHA’s director of state legislative and regulatory advocacy, at ral-mondhiry@asha.org or 800-498-2071, ext. 5665.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
May 2009
Volume 14, Issue 7