News In Brief Researchers have identified a gene (abbreviated MTHGD1L) on chromosome six that appears to increase a person’s risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers looked at gene variation throughout the human genomes of 2,269 people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and 3,107 people without AD and found that individuals with a ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   May 01, 2010
News In Brief
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Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Older Adults & Aging / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   May 01, 2010
News In Brief
The ASHA Leader, May 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15062010.3
The ASHA Leader, May 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15062010.3
Gene Linked to Alzheimer’s
Researchers have identified a gene (abbreviated MTHGD1L) on chromosome six that appears to increase a person’s risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers looked at gene variation throughout the human genomes of 2,269 people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and 3,107 people without AD and found that individuals with a particular variation of MTHFD1L may be twice as likely to develop AD. The research was presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in April. Search “Alzheimer’s new gene” at WebMD.
Team Approach to Cleft Lip
Children with a cleft lip or palate who receive care by a team, rather than by an individual provider, are more likely to receive recommended health care. Researchers interviewed the mothers of 253 children born with a cleft lip, cleft palate, or both, between 1998 and 2003. Mothers whose children had received care from a team—a surgeon, a dental professional, and an SLP—rated their child’s care higher than those mothers whose children received care from a single provider. Children with single providers also were less likely to have received noncleft-related medical care such as a hearing test in the past year or a dental visit. For more go to the study results study results online [PDF].
Emotions and Alzheimer’s
A loved one with Alzheimer’s disease may forget a conversation, but may still experience emotions tied to certain experiences. In a study, individuals with memory loss viewed clips of happy and sad movies on separate days. Although the participants couldn’t recall what they had watched, they retained the elicited emotions. For more, go to the story on National Public Radio.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
May 2010
Volume 15, Issue 6