Kelly Knollman-Porter An “open-door policy” is rare to find with the demanding schedule of a college instructor, especially one in the midst of completing a PhD. However, the door to Room 21 in Bachelor Hall is rarely closed. Kelly Knollman-Porter, or “KP” as she is affectionately called by students, teaches graduate courses ... Golden Apple
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Golden Apple  |   May 01, 2010
Kelly Knollman-Porter
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Golden Apple
Golden Apple   |   May 01, 2010
Kelly Knollman-Porter
The ASHA Leader, May 2010, Vol. 15, 37. doi:10.1044/leader.GA.15062010.37
The ASHA Leader, May 2010, Vol. 15, 37. doi:10.1044/leader.GA.15062010.37

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An “open-door policy” is rare to find with the demanding schedule of a college instructor, especially one in the midst of completing a PhD. However, the door to Room 21 in Bachelor Hall is rarely closed. Kelly Knollman-Porter, or “KP” as she is affectionately called by students, teaches graduate courses in aphasia and neurocognitive disorders at Miami University. Although it is always difficult to rise for an 8 a.m. class, KP’s lectures never put you to sleep. She is always prepared, clearly explains the material, provides applicable examples, and waits patiently for questions as information slowly seeps into our brains.
But beyond being an educator, KP is a clinician. Every day she reminds us that being a clinician is about being flexible and understanding and incorporating the client’s lifestyle and family into treatment. She teaches us the information not found in the textbook. Although challenging, her diagnostic assessments and case presentations force “real-life” clinical application of goal creation and implementation of treatment.
I sometimes forget that KP has a family outside of our class, as I always find myself and others spending part of the day in her office talking about life and school. Moreover, she is the externship coordinator and supervisor for adult day care services rotation, The Knolls of Oxford rotation, and the monthly stroke support group meetings.
Thank you, KP, for reminding us that there are professors who care not only for our educational welfare but also for the human being behind the stressed, anxious graduate student. Your genuine dedication to your students and the field of speech-language pathology inspires and reminds us of true human compassion and drive. Thank you for taking the time to care and know about our lives in and outside the classroom.
Marianne Bernadsky
Cincinnati, Ohio
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May 2010
Volume 15, Issue 6