News In Brief According to research in the June issue of the Journal of Proteome Research, children with autism may have a different chemical fingerprint in their urine than children who do not have autism. Researchers from the Imperial College London and the University of South Australia analyzed the urine of three ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2010
News In Brief
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2010
News In Brief
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.15092010.3
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.15092010.3
Urine Test for Autism?
According to research in the June issue of the Journal of Proteome Research, children with autism may have a different chemical fingerprint in their urine than children who do not have autism. Researchers from the Imperial College London and the University of South Australia analyzed the urine of three groups of 3- to 9-year-olds: 39 children with autism, 28 typically developing siblings of children with autism, and 34 typically developing children without a sibling with autism. All three groups had different chemical fingerprints.
1 Treatment, 2 Populations
Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and those with Down syndrome share an accumulation of β-amyloid protein in their brains. Researchers believe that drugs that help reduce this protein in patients with AD also may treat mental retardation in children with Down syndrome. Mice treated with a compound called DAPT, known to suppress production of β-amyloid, had a rapid reduction in β-amyloid levels and were significantly better able to learn to navigate a maze and remember locations of important features. Normal siblings were unaffected by DAPT. More information about the study is available online.
Sleep-Deprived With TBI
People with traumatic brain injury (TBI) may produce lower amounts of melatonin, a hormone that can affect sleep. Researchers studied 23 people who had experienced a severe TBI an average of 14 months earlier and 23 same-age healthy people. The healthy people produced more melatonin in the evening hours than those with TBI, who also spent less time actually asleep and had a lower “sleep efficiency” percentage than the healthy group. Visit Neurology for more information.
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August 2010
Volume 15, Issue 9