State-of-the-Art Topics Highlight Audiology Offerings In keeping within the Convention theme, “Leadership Into New Frontiers,” it is fitting that the success of the 2010 Convention would be linked directly to those individuals responsible for selecting much of the subject matter. These individuals are the topic coordinators for the 2010 Convention—leaders in audiology and experts in ... ASHA Convention Coverage
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ASHA Convention Coverage  |   August 01, 2010
State-of-the-Art Topics Highlight Audiology Offerings
Author Notes
  • Anthony T. Cacace, PhD, CCC-A, audiology co-chair of the 2010 Convention and a professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wayne State University, can be reached at cacacea@wayne.edu.
    Anthony T. Cacace, PhD, CCC-A, audiology co-chair of the 2010 Convention and a professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wayne State University, can be reached at cacacea@wayne.edu.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / ASHA Convention Coverage
ASHA Convention Coverage   |   August 01, 2010
State-of-the-Art Topics Highlight Audiology Offerings
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 20. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC3.15092010.20
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 20. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC3.15092010.20
In keeping within the Convention theme, “Leadership Into New Frontiers,” it is fitting that the success of the 2010 Convention would be linked directly to those individuals responsible for selecting much of the subject matter.
These individuals are the topic coordinators for the 2010 Convention—leaders in audiology and experts in the selected areas of interest. Indeed, we are fortunate to have such a pool of scientists and clinicians within our organization and we now recognize these individuals, thank them for their efforts, and acknowledge their dedication to advancing the field. Each has taken responsibility for coordinating Convention offerings in specific areas of audiology:
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University—adult diagnostic testing

  • Lenore Holte, University of Iowa—infant diagnostic testing

  • Larry Humes, Indiana University—auditory processing disorders

  • Robert Novak, Purdue University—hearing aids and adult rehabilitation

  • Susan Nittrouer, Ohio State University—rehabilitation for infants and children with hearing loss

  • Faith Akin, James H. Quillen VA Medical Center—vestibular/balance-related issues and traumatic brain injury

  • John Preece, City University of New York—hearing science

Combined, this group of individuals has organized offerings on contemporary, state-of-the-art topics that attendees expect and require to engage their broad range of interests. The educational core of the audiology sessions comprises seminars and short courses that provide practical, theoretical, and evidence-based information. In technical sessions, new research that stimulates and expands the knowledge will be presented.
Technical sessions—categorized into adult diagnostic testing, auditory processing disorders (APDs), and hearing science—are always highlights of the Convention. Topics in adult diagnostic testing include steady-state auditory-evoked potentials, reliability of distortion product otoacoustic emission (OAE) growth functions, and the incidental detection of cerebellar pontine angle tumors.
APD sessions will examine advanced concepts in cortical auditory event-related potentials, auditory processing in autism spectrum disorders, and age-related cortical processing in the presence of noise.
The hearing science area covers human and animal studies, age-related auditory changes in diabetes, developmental changes in OAEs and broadband middle-ear power reflectance, electrophysiological investigations, perceptual studies, and issues related to tinnitus.
Of particular interest are the variety of one- and two-hour seminars covering the content areas of infant diagnostic testing; intervention for hearing loss in adults; rehabilitation for infants, children, and adults with hearing loss; and vestibular- and balance-related issues. Topics will include updates on frequency-lowering techniques in hearing aids, expanded cochlear implant candidacy criteria, use of music in rehabilitation, methods for improving speech perception in noise, updates on the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and much more.
Short courses focus on intervention for hearing loss in adults specifically related to person-centered aural rehabilitation and the ever-expanding vestibular and balance-related areas. Issues in this domain include recent developments in otolithic function and assessment, vestibular consequences of blast injury, and assessment of balance function in children.
A special session on auditory processing and literacy put together by John Durrant of the University of Pittsburgh and colleagues also will be noteworthy.
Taken together, these audiology sessions offer impressive and comprehensive coverage of important areas that should be of interest to all who attend. I look forward to meeting ASHA audiologists in Philadelphia!
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August 2010
Volume 15, Issue 9