Fabulous Philadelphia: More Than History The ASHA Convention is sure to attract many attendees with its variety of clinical and professional sessions and speakers, but there’s another big reason this Convention is sure to be popular—its location. Philadelphia is an exciting city with a rich history, and no matter what you’re into, the City of ... ASHA Convention Coverage
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ASHA Convention Coverage  |   August 01, 2010
Fabulous Philadelphia: More Than History
Author Notes
  • Kellie Rowden-Racette, print and online editor for The ASHA Leader, can be reached at krowden-racette@asha.org.
    Kellie Rowden-Racette, print and online editor for The ASHA Leader, can be reached at krowden-racette@asha.org.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / ASHA Convention Coverage
ASHA Convention Coverage   |   August 01, 2010
Fabulous Philadelphia: More Than History
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 22-23. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC2.15092010.22
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 22-23. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC2.15092010.22
The ASHA Convention is sure to attract many attendees with its variety of clinical and professional sessions and speakers, but there’s another big reason this Convention is sure to be popular—its location. Philadelphia is an exciting city with a rich history, and no matter what you’re into, the City of Brotherly Love will welcome you with open arms.
Historical Haven
As the birthplace of American democracy, Philadelphia’s history credentials are impeccable. The city was founded in 1682 by an English Quaker, William Penn, whom King Charles II granted a 1,280-acre parcel of land between the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers. With visions of a “Greene Countrie Towne,” Penn asked Captain Thomas Holmes to design the city in a grid pattern with wide streets and several green public squares. These squares—Washington, Franklin, Rittenhouse, and Logan—showcase some of the amazing historic sites linked to the nation’s birth.
From 1774 to 1800, Philadelphia’s history is tied closely to the American Revolution and many treasured symbols and buildings from that era are open to visitors. Among the squares you’ll find the nation’s most historic square mile—Independence National Historical Park—and see attractions such as the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall (where the Declaration of Independence was first adopted), and Carpenter’s Hall (site of the First Continental Congress in 1774).
Excitement and Culture
Even if history initially attracts you to Philly, the excitement and culture will keep you wanting to explore more of this metropolitan gem. The city is home to many museums: Academy of Natural Science, Mütter Museum (the College of Physicians of Philadelphia’s collection of medical oddities, anatomical and pathological specimens, wax models, and antique medical equipment), Philadelphia Museum of Art, Rodin Museium, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Franklin Institute Science Museum, and many others.
If food is what you’re after, Philadelphia is home to global cuisines—Italian, Polish, Vietnamese, American barbeque—you name it, Philly has it (see “Cheryl’s Restaurant Picks” in the print publication). But don’t forget to try a Philly Cheesesteak! It’s not really a steak at all, but chipped steak cooked on a grill; the sandwich was the happy result of an experiment by Italian immigrant brothers in the 1930s. Working as hot dog vendors, they decided one day to buy some beef and grill it with onions. A legend was born!
Sports, Shopping
If it’s a more active lifestyle that keeps you going, Philadelphia offers a wide variety of sporting venues and is home to several professional teams, including the Eagles and the Flyers. Convention coincides with the Philadelphia Marathon, an annual sporting event hosted by the city on the third Sunday of November. Race weekend activities include a Health & Fitness Expo, Runners’ Pasta Party, Rothman Institute 8K, and Kids Fun Run—all leading up to the marathon and half marathon races on Sunday. Spectators are welcome!
The city’s many parks offer plenty of places for walking, running, and intramural sports of every description. And don’t forget to follow in the steps of boxer Rocky Balboa with a morning jog to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, saving some energy for a sprint up the famous stairs. After you lose the band of kids who are bound to follow you, you can take your photo with Rocky’s statue.
Forgot your workout gear? No need to worry—the shopping choices rival those of any major city and there is no sales tax on clothing and shoes. So check out Macy’s Center City in the famous Wanamaker Building on Market Street or wander through the high-end boutiques on Rittenhouse Row and Walnut Street. If your shopping takes you beyond the city limits, check out the King of Prussia Mall, the largest shopping mall on the East Coast, or the Philadelphia Premium Outlets, a mecca for bargain hunters.
Yes, the Convention is going to be a smash, but try to take some time to explore this amazing city. Even if it’s been years since you came here with your elementary-school class to see the Liberty Bell, take this opportunity to see what else Philadelphia has to offer.
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August 2010
Volume 15, Issue 9