Audiology In Brief The policy board of the U.S. Access Board voted unanimously on July 28 to proceed with the development of rules to reference new classroom acoustics standards in guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act and Architectural Barriers Act. The Access Board, an independent federal agency devoted to accessibility for ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2010
Audiology In Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2010
Audiology In Brief
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15102010.5
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15102010.5
Rulemaking on Classroom Acoustics
The policy board of the U.S. Access Board voted unanimously on July 28 to proceed with the development of rules to reference new classroom acoustics standards in guidelines for the Americans with Disabilities Act and Architectural Barriers Act. The Access Board, an independent federal agency devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities, indicated that the classroom acoustics rulemaking will be placed on a fast track. It will begin working immediately on regulatory assessment (a cost-benefit analysis) required to support a Notice of Public Rulemaking (NPRM), which will be publlished in the Federal Register and open for public comment.
The decision is a victory for classroom acoustics standards. Both private and congressional actions have failed to implement this standard nationwide, and regulatory action by the Access Board will mandate that school acoustical standards are in place to ensure an appropriate speaking and listening environment for educators and students. For more information, contact Neil Snyder, director of federal advocacy, at nsnyder@asha.org.
Mobile Video Relay Service
People who use American Sign Language now will be able to use a mobile phone to communicate with others without hearing loss using a video relay service. Previously, use of a video relay service required callers to have a laptop or desktop computer with a webcam; the caller would initiate a videoconference with an interpreter who would relay the conversation between two parties, translating spoken words into sign language for the person who is deaf. Because of the need to videoconference to access the relay service, mobile phone users who are deaf were limited to text communication. In late July, video relay service provider ZVRS launched the first mobile relay service using Apple’s FaceTime application for iPhone 4. FaceTime operates only over Wi-Fi networks.
Mobile Captioned Telephone
Captioned telephone relay service is now available to mobile phone users who are hard of hearing. The service is similar to closed captioning provided on many television programs; mobile phone users will be able to read word-for-word captions on their phones when they place or receive calls through Hamilton Relay Services. Mobile CapTel will initially be available on the iPhone 3G™ by downloading a free application, but the company plans to expand the service to other devices and networks.
Listening Habits of College Students
Auburn University researchers who surveyed the listening habits of 428 college students who frequently use personal music players (PMPs) found that the majority of listeners use PMPs for less than two hours a day at safe volume levels. About a third of respondents to the online survey reported being distracted while using a PMP, and more than a third experienced soreness in their ears after PMP use. About a third of the students reported occasionally using PMPs at maximum volume levels. Overall, respondents indicated a willingness to reduce volume levels, decrease listening duration, and buy specialized earphones to conserve hearing, according to a June 2010 article in the American Journal of Audiology.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2010
Volume 15, Issue 10