News In Brief Coffee-drinkers may have some protection against head and neck cancer. A recent study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention used information from a pooled analysis of nine studies collected by the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. Participants who drank four or more cups of coffee daily had ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2010
News In Brief
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2010
News In Brief
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15102010.3
The ASHA Leader, August 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15102010.3
Coffee and Cancer Risk
Coffee-drinkers may have some protection against head and neck cancer. A recent study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention used information from a pooled analysis of nine studies collected by the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. Participants who drank four or more cups of coffee daily had a 39% decreased risk of oral cavity and pharynx cancers compared with those who were non-drinkers. Visit the journal online (search “coffee and pharynx”).
New Military Center for TBI
A new medical center for members of the military who suffer from traumatic brain injury (TBI) has opened in Bethesda, Md. The 72,000-sq.-ft. National Intrepid Center of Excellence, on the National Naval Medical Center grounds, offers services that include advanced digital imaging technology and a serene “naturalistic center.” About 115,000 troops have experienced TBI in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Visit medical center’s website.
Emotional Support for Kids
Preschool students may gain more language and literacy skills if their teachers are highly confident and provide emotional support. Researchers followed 67 teachers and 328 students for 30 weeks; the teachers were then given a questionnaire to measure their self-efficacy and trained coders measured the level of emotional support in the classrooms. Students of teachers with high self-efficacy made gains in print awareness; however, only children in classrooms with emotional support and teachers with high self-efficacy showed gains in vocabulary knowledge skills. See the May 2010 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education.
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August 2010
Volume 15, Issue 10