News In Brief How often an infant gazes at a caregiver’s face could be a subtle but early indicator of a later diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Kennedy Krieger Institute researchers observed 6-month-old infants: 25 siblings of children diagnosed with ASD (high risk) and 25 with no family history of ASD ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   October 01, 2010
News In Brief
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   October 01, 2010
News In Brief
The ASHA Leader, October 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15122010.3
The ASHA Leader, October 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15122010.3
Infant Gaze and Autism Risk
How often an infant gazes at a caregiver’s face could be a subtle but early indicator of a later diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Kennedy Krieger Institute researchers observed 6-month-old infants: 25 siblings of children diagnosed with ASD (high risk) and 25 with no family history of ASD (low risk). High-risk infants showed greater interest in a cause-and-effect toy than in their caregiver’s reaction to the toy. The lack of joint attention is one of ASD’s core deficits. The study appears in the September issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry [search “A.N. Bhat”].
Poor Prognosis for Dysphagia Patients?
Patients who have dysphagia may have longer hospital stays and a poorer prognosis than patients without dysphagia. According to data analyzed from the 2005Р2006 National Hospital Discharge Survey, the median number of hospital days was 4.04 for patients with dysphagia and 2.4 for patients without dysphagia, and those with dysphagia had a 13-fold increased risk of dying during their hospitalizations. The study appears in the August issue of Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
Men More Prone to MCI
Both genders experience mild cognitive impairment (MCI), especially during the later years, but men may have a higher incidence. Researchers evaluated 1,969 dementia-free older people and found signs of MCI in 16%. Prevalence was greater among older participants and was higher in men (19%) than in women (14%). The article appears in the September issue of Neurology.
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October 2010
Volume 15, Issue 12